Review: Ramblings in Ireland by Kerry Dwyer

4 Star

Kerry Dwyer’s Ramblings in Ireland, is aptly titled for that is exactly what the story is about, the ramblings through a country with present descriptions, of dangerous excursions to a ledge forbidden in fog (which they accidentally journeyed onto), to ill prepared clothing for rain, to a husband’s compulsion for the Irish breakfast, the journey as it happened, coupled with the ramblings of times past. The word ramblings in the abstract can connote a pejorative, which would be anything but the case with Dwyer’s story, for her writing is endearing and intelligent with a rare gifted ability to make the reader laugh, her asides had me laughing out loud.
Dwyer invites the reader in to her life, the mundane which through her talent are captivating and as the story progresses along you feel as if you’re listening to a friend, a good friend, telling you about their vacation, and you get excited that you, for this brief time, have the vicarious pleasure of being let in, to more than just descriptions of the travels in a country, but of a women, her relationship with her family (the incidental mention of her grandfather’s assassination in Palestine, her mother’s mistaken identity for an Indian, to her husband’s ability to pee anywhere, etc.). Her scene description is exceptional; when they go into a dining room you can see the people there, the pink-rinsed grandmothers, grunge clothing, dreadlocks… masterful imagery that brings you there, the detail right down to what she brought with on the trip. As the trip ends the author describes her love for reading and in the author’s note she mentions her blog: […].
When I went to check it out the first thing I noticed was a column at the top titled What is Rambling. There beside her answer is a photo of Freud, a brilliant metaphor for her journey and life, as she so adeptly, and with great humor, portrayed in her ramblings.

About The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap

The year 1895 was filled with memorable historical events: the Dreyfus Affair divided France; Booker T. Washington gave his Atlanta address; Richard Olney, United States Secretary of State, expanded the effects of the Monroe Doctrine in settling a boundary dispute between the United Kingdom and Venezuela; and Oscar Wilde was tried and convicted for "gross indecency" under Britian's recently passed law that made sex between males a criminal offense. When the news of Wilde's conviction went out over telegraphs worldwide, it threw a small Nevada town into chaos. This is the story of what happened when the lives of its citizens were impacted by the news of Oscar Wildes' imprisonment. It is chronicle of hatred and prejudice with all its unintended and devastating consequences, and how love and friendship bring strength and healing. Paulette Mahurin, the author, is a Nurse Practitioner who lives in Ojai, California with her husband Terry and their two dogs--- Max and Bella. She practices women's health in a rural clinic and writes in her spare time. All profits from her book are going to animal rescue, Santa Paula Animal Shelter, the first and only no-kill shelter in Ventura County, CA, where she lives. (see links below on Ventura County Star Article & Shelter) To find out more please go the The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap on facebook or Amazon or e-mail us at the gavatar addresses. Thank you. (photos: of Paulette, her family, and a reading at The Ojai Art Center, July 2012)
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9 Responses to Review: Ramblings in Ireland by Kerry Dwyer

  1. Kerry Dwyer says:

    Reblogged this on Kerry Dwyer and commented:
    What better praise is there for an author than when another author admires your work? Paulette Mahurin, author of “The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap” reviewed Ramblings in Ireland. Here is her review. I am overwhelmed.

  2. I totally agree with the review. “Endearing” is one description that rings particularly true for me. Having met Kerry only through this blog, I feel she speaks through the book as a “dear” friend. That alone is quite (ahem) endearing. And yes, then there are the asides. I feel as though I am delightfully inside the asides with my new found friend. Brava.

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