Review @Librarymosaic by Carla in Portugal: A story about hatred and intolerance and how those feelings affect the people they target.

http://librarymosaic.blogspot.com/2012/12/review-persecution-of-mildred-dunlap-by.html?showComment=1355961650647#c3222119466380945326

Review – The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap by Paulette Mahurin

 

Title and Author: The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap by Paulette Mahurin
Publisher:
Publication Date: January 1st, 2012
Paperback/Hardcover: 2012
Genre: Historical,
Find it at: Goodreads /
Summary:
The year 1895 was filled with memorable historical events: the Dreyfus Affair divided France; Booker T. Washington gave his Atlanta address; Richard Olney, United States Secretary of State, expanded the effects of the Monroe Doctrine in settling a boundary dispute between the United Kingdom and Venezuela; and Oscar Wilde was tried and convicted for gross indecency under Britain’s recently passed law that made sex between males a criminal offense. When news of Wilde’s conviction went out over telegraphs worldwide, it threw a small Nevada town into chaos. This is the story of what happened when the lives of its citizens were impacted by the news of Oscar Wilde’s imprisonment. It is a chronicle of hatred and prejudice with all its unintended and devastating consequences, and how love and friendship bring strength and healing.
Review:
I have received this book from the author in exchange of an honest review.
In 1985 Oscar Wilde was tried and convicted for gross indecency under Britain’s recently passed law that made sex between males a criminal offense. When that news reaches a small town in Nevada, chaos erupts.
In this book we meet several characters from a small town in Nevada. These are all very interesting and intriguing characters and the story revolves around them and the prejudices they held on to. The events of this book happen in 1895, the year when Oscar Wilde is found guilty and sent to jail for gross indecency, that is, for being caught with another man. As that news reaches the town it reacts and the readers get to know Mildred Dunlap, Edra and Charley and join them in their attempts to go on with their lives even when they are being persecuted because of their actions and choices.
The historical atmosphere is very well-written and allows the story to unfold perfectly. As you might have guessed the book is about gossip and prejudice against same sex relationships and the persecution of people who engaged in them.
I think the author did a great job telling a story about hatred and intolerance and how those feelings affect the people they target.
There’s a great message in this book: tolerance is needed and friendships should be cultivated and kept.
All in all, I really enjoyed this story and thought the stories about the people in town were very interesting. This is well-written story about an important topic with good characters, some of whom you would like and others not so much.
This is a story about intolerance and prejudice that I think any historical fan might enjoy.
Rating: Worth Your Time (4 Stars)

About The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap

The year 1895 was filled with memorable historical events: the Dreyfus Affair divided France; Booker T. Washington gave his Atlanta address; Richard Olney, United States Secretary of State, expanded the effects of the Monroe Doctrine in settling a boundary dispute between the United Kingdom and Venezuela; and Oscar Wilde was tried and convicted for "gross indecency" under Britian's recently passed law that made sex between males a criminal offense. When the news of Wilde's conviction went out over telegraphs worldwide, it threw a small Nevada town into chaos. This is the story of what happened when the lives of its citizens were impacted by the news of Oscar Wildes' imprisonment. It is chronicle of hatred and prejudice with all its unintended and devastating consequences, and how love and friendship bring strength and healing. Paulette Mahurin, the author, is a Nurse Practitioner who lives in Ojai, California with her husband Terry and their two dogs--- Max and Bella. She practices women's health in a rural clinic and writes in her spare time. All profits from her book are going to animal rescue, Santa Paula Animal Shelter, the first and only no-kill shelter in Ventura County, CA, where she lives. (see links below on Ventura County Star Article & Shelter) To find out more please go the The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap on facebook or Amazon or e-mail us at the gavatar addresses. Thank you. (photos: of Paulette, her family, and a reading at The Ojai Art Center, July 2012)
This entry was posted in BLOGGER'S REVIEWS, INTERVIEWS, EXCERPTS, REVIEWS, REVIEWS: THE PERSECUTION OF MILDRED DUNLAP. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Review @Librarymosaic by Carla in Portugal: A story about hatred and intolerance and how those feelings affect the people they target.

  1. Some of what you said, I had not heard before. This is purely my opinion and know that others may have another thought opposing this. I am not an advocate of anything but heterosexual relationships, marriage of one man and one woman etc. In my faith I have read too many scriptures that teach me how it is an abomination to God. Therefore I cannot embrace that. However having said that, I would never hurt or cause harm to anyone who believed different than I. That is between them and God and not me. I have seen how these relationships have caused so much harm and financial adversity to others including those engaging in them. I have worked with and been friends with gay men who I enjoyed talking to them. I love them, but not the behavior. I really don’t believe in causing people harm and don’t advocate that ever. That is the tolerance I believe in. I won’t accept something that God says is an abomination. But I know He would want me to love them as people which I do. Very good post. Thanks for sharing it.
    Yisraela

    • Hello 2embracethelight and thank you for stopping by. What you wrote and how you wrote it seems to manifest tolerance, which really is simply accepting another human being for who they are which doesn’t mean agreeing with their actions. It’s simply not hating them because of their actions. We’re all different, different makeup, conditioning, belief systems, preferences, etc. and when we can embrace our differences in a loving (tolerant) manner then perhaps doors can open for peace on earth. I deeply respect what you wrote and that you came here to express it. Thank you.

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