The Dog The Ruined And Saved My Life

The inspiration behind all my profits going to the first and only no kill animal shelter in Ventura County, CA.

Discover The Expert in You

By Paulette Mahurin

The first time I saw Tazzie, she was resting on a blanket in the front office of a kill shelter I went to visit. All seventy-eight pounds or her rottie self were confined to a small corner in the room, where the staff had taken pity on her. She immediately caught my attention, her eyes dug into mine, come here, come to me. So I did, while her little stub of a tail wagged, the only part of her body moving.

Tazzie was from a puppy mill in Arkansas, a Rottweiler money-making-farm that shipped puppies to pet shops all over the United States, to be sold, quite a lucrative business for all concerned, except the dogs. Tazzie landed in a store in Santa Monica, California, all the papers were still in her Humane Society file.

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About The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap

The year 1895 was filled with memorable historical events: the Dreyfus Affair divided France; Booker T. Washington gave his Atlanta address; Richard Olney, United States Secretary of State, expanded the effects of the Monroe Doctrine in settling a boundary dispute between the United Kingdom and Venezuela; and Oscar Wilde was tried and convicted for "gross indecency" under Britian's recently passed law that made sex between males a criminal offense. When the news of Wilde's conviction went out over telegraphs worldwide, it threw a small Nevada town into chaos. This is the story of what happened when the lives of its citizens were impacted by the news of Oscar Wildes' imprisonment. It is chronicle of hatred and prejudice with all its unintended and devastating consequences, and how love and friendship bring strength and healing. Paulette Mahurin, the author, is a Nurse Practitioner who lives in Ojai, California with her husband Terry and their two dogs--- Max and Bella. She practices women's health in a rural clinic and writes in her spare time. All profits from her book are going to animal rescue, Santa Paula Animal Shelter, the first and only no-kill shelter in Ventura County, CA, where she lives. (see links below on Ventura County Star Article & Shelter) To find out more please go the The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap on facebook or Amazon or e-mail us at the gavatar addresses. Thank you. (photos: of Paulette, her family, and a reading at The Ojai Art Center, July 2012)
This entry was posted in ABOUT THE BOOK, ANIMAL RESCUE, ARTICLES, BLOGGER'S REVIEWS, INTERVIEWS, EXCERPTS, DOGS RESCUED, INTERVIEWS, PAINTINGS, PERSONAL POSTS. Bookmark the permalink.

28 Responses to The Dog The Ruined And Saved My Life

  1. Julie Catherine says:

    Paulette, your beautiful story brought tears to my eyes; thank you so much for all that you do for our furry friends and families. I know that when it’s time for my little Annie to leave me, it will be so hard to see her go. She was my youngest brother’s dog and he died of pancreatic cancer just before Christmas, 2007. Annie and I had already bonded as I used to take her to the hospital every morning so she could spend some time with my brother, Andy. When he passed, Annie kind of adopted me, and I’ve had her ever since then – I love her dearly. She will be 20 years old this Christmas!

    I love that you donate all the proceeds from your book to the no-kill shelter, and wish you, and them, all the best. I’ve read The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap, and it’s a wonderful, beautifully written and thought-provoking book – a terrific read!

    Bless you and your family! Love, Julie xoxox

    • Annie is TWENTY YEARS OLD. Well bless your sweet heart, and your beloved brother’s as well, for taking such good care that you’ve had her for so long. She must be an incredibly amazing furry girl. If you read your beautiful poetry to her I bet that would explain some of her longevity, it is magnificent–I can’t say it enough times.
      You and your beautiful sharing here means the world to me. Please give your Annie girl a very special rubbie from me. Love, Paulette xoxoxo

      • Julie Catherine says:

        Paulette, Annie says to tell you thank you – and yes, her mum does read to her all the time; although she has difficulty making out all the words sometimes! LOL.

        Annie is a cross between a Toy Poodle and a Terrier, and weighs almost 3 pounds. The vet had to remove all her teeth and one eye a few years ago when she had a horrible infection … but even though she’s a bit slow and almost blind in her other eye, she makes up for it in ATTITUDE! Hahaha. She is a real Diva with a voracious appetite, and does better than I do some days.

        Thanks again for the lovely compliments on my poetry – they mean so much to me! Love and hugs, Julie xoxox

      • Annie sounds like a perfect friend and teacher. That she maintains her life, attitude, despite the hands she’s been dealt, I’ve much to learn from your girl. So absolutely thrilled to have had this conversation with you. ❤

  2. tazzielove says:

    She was a wonderful dog, our Tazzie. She loved you above all else, Paulette. I bore witness to that, honey. Your Terry

  3. fournier0917 says:

    The painting says it all, but the words you add confirms there is no doubt of the tender emotions you felt and now share with us. Thanks to Tazzie, and your talented best seller writing, there are now added lucky ones saved from being condemned, or potentially so, who came, and come to your attention. Bravo dear friend! Jean-Jacques

  4. 68ghia says:

    At last I know the whole story P!
    And what a beautiful one it was, and still is.
    A watershed moment, and you lived to literally tell the tale, and to make a difference in so many innocent animals’ lives.
    G-d Bless!!

  5. People can be so callous and cold. So sad.

    • So true. Tazzie’s first few months were pretty gruesome but boy did she have a great rest of her life once she healed. She lived to be a little over 15 years, which is ancient for a rottie. Thank goodness for all the good people who do help and make a difference to balance things out. Hugs to you, Tess.

  6. seeker says:

    Reading it the second times still gives me this warm fuzzy feeling. I want to focus on the goodness of Tazie to you and you to her. In the end, the book.

  7. Beautiful touching, emotional and sad. It is all here and made me cry. Tassie was a beauty. Fate worked for her and then for you. If you had not written the book we would not have know of your work and of your good deeds for the pets. Often good things happen as a result of bad happenings. I think the story of Tassie and your illness would make a great story as a book. Give it some thought. You are a wonderful writer and I bet the book would be a good seller. I know that I’d buy the book for sure. 🙂

    • You are so kind, a heartfelt huge thank you, my animal loving friend. I’m currently working on my second book and put Tazzie in as the protagonist’s dog, with some of her story in it. It’s based on a true story of a couple with cancer who met and fell in love. I worked with them and knew their story but not enough of the details of their lives so I fictionalized it. It’s so amazing what these furry kids of ours do to our hearts. I know you know. Perhaps some day, I will just write about my love affair with Tazzie. Thank you for your loving support. Love, Paulette

  8. natuurfreak says:

    Gives me such a warm feeling.

  9. WordsFallFromMyEyes says:

    Paulette, that was an enormously touching story. I’m so glad for people like you in these dogs’ lives.

    • We all have our stories, don’t we? It always amazes me to hear them and changes things, how I see the person, how I see myself, how I see the world. One of my greatest joys is helping dogs, and I love those dedicated people who really put themselves out there to do the rescue work, day and night. I deeply admire them along with all the good people in this world who do things, big and small, to help make a difference. Have a great day. 🙂

  10. Clowie says:

    She was very special.

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