877 dogs rescued from kill shelters

I’m deeply grateful to everyone who has purchased, read, and taken the time to review one of my books. All profits from my books go to help get dogs like Jace, Gabe, Dobie, Oliver, Abigail, Thatcher, Bean, Bianca, Premanti, Carlos, Abriella, Stacey, Marco, Clyde, Parker, Tyler, Nitro, Aisha, Paxton, Alannah, Bacchus, Newton, Blitz, Albert, Ally, Wyatt, Aldo, Trapper, Bliss, Carla, Raider & Brownie, (see photos below) out of kill shelters. So far in 2017 we’ve helped free 877 dogs. In 2016, 250 dogs were freed. In 2015, 148 dogs were freed.

AND please for everyone who’s purchased a book could I humbly ask you to write a review when you’ve completed the read.  Amazon promotes and ranks books according to number of reviews in addition to sales. Every voice helps spread the word and that is an energy that can help a dog.

LINK TO PURCHASE ALL MY BOOKS and to see all reviews for all my books click on the books cover:

AMAZON U.S.

AMAZON U.K.
And on all other Amazon sites around the world.
AMAZON RANKING
My books have been ranked in the top 100 best sellers on Amazon U.S. in their categories (historical fiction, teen and young adult, and literary fiction).  What an honor to be ranked #87  LITERARY FICTION BEST SELLER next to Paulo Coelho; incredible author of The Alchemist and The Pilgrimage.
paulo-chscreen-shot-2016-08-18-at-8-33-05-am-copy-3
Amazon Australia ranked my book NUMBER ONE in all it’s categories: Literary Fiction, Historical Fiction & Teen and Young Adult and is #3 best seller in the entire kindle bookstore.
AMAZON AU BEST SELLER Screen Shot 2017-06-01 at 6.13.16 AM
AMAZON AU #1 LITERARY FICTION Screen Shot 2017-06-01 at 6.11.45 AM
AMAZON AU #1 HISTORICAL FICTION
AMAZON AU #1 TEEN AND YOUNG ADULT
#3 BEST SELLER IN THE ENTIRE KINDLE STORE Screen Shot 2017-06-01 at 6.25.27 AM
And in Amazon U.K. it just made it to the top 10 best seller list in Literary Fiction (#2) and Historical Fiction (#5) categories:
AMAZON UK #2 LITERARY FICTION Screen Shot 2017-08-04 at 6.10.00 AM
AMAZON UK #5 HISTORICAL FICTION Screen Shot 2017-08-05 at 6.19.36 AM
RECENT REVIEWS FOR THE DAY I SAW THE HUMMINGBIRD
AMAZON U.S.
on December 2, 2017
Haunting portrayal of a shameful portion of America history. Mahurin takes on a difficult subject and infuses humanity and grace into her characters on every page.
on November 28, 2017

I’ve read Paulette Mahurin’s previous book, and like that one, this one is very well written. Having read a lot of indie books that have terrible grammar/spelling/pacing/what have you, it makes me very appreciative when authors like Mahurin take the time and patience to make a quality read like this one.

The only thing that makes this one hard to read for me is the content itself, if only because it takes an unflinching look at slavery from the point of view of a man looking back on his childhood. Usually, in books like this, we read about the heroes, the ones who set up the Underground Railroad, who rallied against their oppresses. But in this story, we’re reading about someone who has to hope for those things to happen. Now, normally, this would be a death knell for any book because who wants to read about a passive protagonist? But I found it made the book more engaging and tense. You know freedom is coming for Oscar, but like him you have to wait, and that means putting up with people so vile, I really just wanted to reach into the book to strangle them. It made the more emotional scenes have a really big impact, and I couldn’t help but feel for Oscar and his family. (Bonus: I can tell this book was also very well researched and the information presented to me did not make it feel like I was reading a history book or was told through exposition. That’s a really hard thing to pull off, so bravo to Mahurin for nailing this.)

It also helps that this book has a great narrator. He gets angry and hopeful, sad and happy. He helps guide us through the tougher parts of his journey. I also deeply loved his relationship with his mother and I was pulled in every moment they spent together. I did tear up a couple of times, and that’s really hard to pull out from someone like me who has a cold, black heart. I think what also makes it very effective is that I never felt like the author was FORCING me to feel bad for these people. She didn’t FORCE me to buy into the relationships Oscar has. Also the writing is very lovely at times, and very heartbreaking.

So why doesn’t this get a full 5 stars from me? Well, I’m a very picky person. While the story moved at a great pace, sometimes I felt like things went a little too fast and sometimes the narrator told me things rather than showed me. I can understand that sometimes you fall into that pit because the story has to move, but I felt like it could have slowed down just a little bit to show me Oscar’s relationship with his friend Sammy. I definitely also wanted more time with his father, a character I really enjoyed and was sad to see had little page time. I also felt like a lot of the themes here have been repeated in other books about the horrors of slavery. That doesn’t mean to say I still don’t find it effective and timely, I do, but I kind of wanted something a little more than “slavery is bad,” “hold on to hope,” etc. I’m really glad I got to read it from a different perspective, but I wish more was done with it. These things didn’t take away my enjoyment of the story, and depending on the kind of reader you are, you might not even notice/care about these things.

That being said, this is really one of the best indie books I’ve read in quite some time and it gives me renewed hope for the indie book industry. This is definitely a story worth reading, and at its price picking it up is a no-brainer. That is, unless you are easily triggered/squeamish because like I said, Mahurin doesn’t shy away from the more brutal aspects of the time period. I’m definitely looking forward to Mahurin’s next release and I hope that it will be sooner rather than later. And if you like this one, then you should read the others because they are just as good.

on November 26, 2017

Four previous books by Paulette Mahurin I read and reviewed before I was notified by the author on the upcoming release of The Day I Saw The Hummingbird. The hummingbird turns out to be the harbinger of bad news to Oscar, born from two slaves on a sugarcane plantation in Lousiana on the eve of the Civil War. Mr. Prescott, the plantation owner, shot Oscar’s father to death and raped his mother several times. His cruelty towards little Oscar is somewhat limited by the help Oscar’s mother provided Prescott’s wife, With other slaves a plan to escape the plantation is worked out. A small bundle of slaves, among which the ten-year-old Oscar succeeded in escaping but with heavy losses along the Underground Railroad network towards states that are friendlier towards black people.

Added to the narrative are Oscar’s struggles with injustice and hate, and the power of language. Oscar was lucky to learn reading and writing at a young age and was helped to improve these skills in New York City where he arrived after an adventurous journey. Although the latter part of the story is told in a more summarized, condensed way compared to the years of slavery and the first part of the escape and stay in a safe house. The novel is a fine work of writing with a touch of limit linguistic capabilities of (former) slaves, and the point of view of a young boy haunted by man-made demons.

on November 24, 2017
As a big fan of historical fiction and an enormous fan of Paulette Mahurin’s work, I was really excited to read her latest release, The Day I Saw the Hummingbird. I was not disappointed. This book is every bit as good as her previous efforts. To tell the story of a young black slave (in these PC days) does take some courage from an author and I commend Mahurin for this. Her portrayal of Oscar’s life and his escape from the plantation for freedom, was sensitive, beautiful and harrowing. I can only recommend this book most highly to all lovers of Historical Fiction. It is a real winner.
on November 24, 2017
I can tell when I’m reading a good book, because when I’m not actually reading it, I continue to think about it. I think about the characters, as well as the story and wonder what’s going to happen next. “The Day I Saw the Hummingbird” is one of those books. The author, Paulette Mahurin has written a heart wrenching story about slavery in the United States during the late 1860s. I use the word “wrenching” here in both an optimistic and pessimistic way. There are situations in this story that show great love and sacrifice, but there are also sections that show intense hatred and heartless acts of metal and physical abuse. The world that Ms. Mahirin has created shows the hopelessness that slaves felt as they endured great cruelty and were thought of as property instead of human beings. “Hummingbird” is a raw and serious novel, which seems a little shocking in today’s world, where most folks seem to focus much of their time on getting the latest cell phone or binge-watching shows on NetFlix. A large portion of the US population live a relatively pampered life which is 180 degrees opposite of this story. As you read this book, think about how much food is in your refrigerator, or how many pairs of socks you have, or the last time you ate around spots of mold on a piece of bread because there was nothing else to eat. This story is going to grab you. It’s going to cut deep. It’ll make an impression. An impression that will reveal to you that no matter which political party a person agrees with, which God they worship or which country they live in, all human beings are people and should be treated with respect and dignity. “Hummingbird” will give you a new perspective on life, I guarantee it.
on November 22, 2017
Such a warm heartfelt book. I could easily empathize with the young slave making his way to freedom in the north. Slavery was quite a blight upon the land, so glad it was made illegal.
AMAZON U.K.
on 1 December 2017
This book is an absolute must read. The cover caught my attention initially, but when I started to read, seeing the world from a black slaves point of view, my mind was opened into a whole new level of horror that these poor souls suffered through.
I won’t give away any spoilers but this is an excellent journey watching one boys life and escape from slave to freedom.
on 24 November 2017
The author sets the milieu for this historical fiction with this Harriet Tubman quote ‘Slavery is the next thing to hell’, and this book pulls no punches in its poignant description of the daily hardships endured in this way of life. In 2017, slavery still exists but it’s not in the public face, it’s small scale and it’s hidden. In 1852, it was a way of life for a great many people. This story, seen through the eyes of a Congolese descendent, Oscar, as he grows from infant to adult, is an incredible journey of endurance on the treacherous road to freedom. Given the life Oscar comes from, his development and reflections are inspirational. The story is well balanced with acts of human cruelty to reveal the hell of slavery and acts of human kindness to fuel hope for freedom. Writing is engaging and compassionate with real heart and emotion flowing from the pages. Visualisation is striking, characters are believable and correctly set in their situation, and the story unfolds at a steady pace. A well-written, well-researched and compelling story. Highly recommended.
GOODREADS
The Day I Saw the Hummingbird: A Novel
by Paulette Mahurin (Goodreads Author)

16315699

Grant Leishman‘s review

Nov 21, 2017
it was amazing*****

bookshelves: read-2017

Anyone who has read my reviews over the years will know I am a big fan of Historical Fiction. I have a few indie authors whose works I treasure and who I absolutely love reading. One of these authors is Paulette Mahurin. She has the ability to move you to tears, whilst still managing to make you chuckle at some odd coincidence of her character’s . When I realised she had a new book out, well, I absolutely knew I had to read it. The Day I Saw the Hummingbird is something totally different from what I had read of Mahurin’s before and yet it still had that indefinable quality of her writing that captures the imagination and draws the reader into her world.

The Day I Saw the Hummingbird follows the adventures and life of Oscar, a young, black, slave in the heartlands of Louisiana around the time of the Civil War. Oscar and his mother dream of freedom and a life of dignity and learning, but when Oscar’s mother is brutally beaten at the hands of a drunken and violent overseer, it is time for the then nine-year-old Oscar to leave and seek the famous “underground railway” to the North and to freedom. Mahurin captures beautifully the times and the attitudes of the South in those days. Her descriptions of the trials and tribulations faced by the young man and the angst and pain he suffers, internally, at the treatment of his people, just because their skin is a different colour, is both moving and heartfelt. One couldn’t help but be drawn into Oscar’s world and feel the horrors faced by just a little boy and the courage required to survive on that long and arduous journey.

The book is written from the perspective of an elderly Oscar, in 1910, looking back at those times and reflecting, sadly, that in many ways, certainly in the South, little had changed since he’d made the long journey. One could even extrapolate and say in 2017, some things still haven’t changed in the South of the United States. I know there has been some controversy in recent times about only “African Americans” can tell the “African American Story”. Whilst I can respect some of the sentiment behind those thoughts, I am glad that Mahurin and others do not subscribe to this theory. As writers we must push the boundaries of our cultural and socio-economic experiences and embrace the pain and suffering of all humanity and point out injustice where we see it. It is what we do! And Mahurin does it superbly. Pain, suffering, injustice, love, friendship and all of the other myriad of human emotions do not belong to and are not confined or identifiable to a particular culture, but are shared across all of humanity and are what binds us together and makes us one race – the Human Race.

I applaud Mahurin for having the courage to write this wonderful story and as always I finish one of her books satisfied and full of thought and follow-up questions. A writer who can do this for a reader is to be celebrated and I place Paulette Mahurin right up there among the very best indie authors (or indeed any authors) out there. There was never any question of my rating for this book – 5+ superb stars all the way.

RECENT REVIEWS FOR THE SEVEN YEAR DRESS
AMAZON U.S.
on December 4, 2017
A good book. Well written and you get to know the characters and feel for them.
GOODREADS:

9699356

Maureen‘s review

Dec 06, 2017
it was amazing *****

 

Another one I could not put down. How some people found the strength to survive and go on while living in a true hell on earth and afterwards is just incredible to me.
PHOTOS OF DOGS RESCUED
JACE RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-11-22 at 2.42.57 PM
Jace has been rescued
JACE FREEDOM PHOTO
Jace’s freedom photo
JACE SETTLING INTO NEW HOME
Jace’s relaxing in new home
GABE 2 RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-11-23 at 6.08.06 AM
Gabe has been rescued
GABE 2 FREEDOM PHOTO
Gabe’s freedom photo
DOBIE RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-11-24 at 6.07.38 AM
Dobie has been rescued
DOBIE FREEDOM PHOTO
Dobie’s freedom photo

 

OLIVER 3 RESCUEDScreen Shot 2017-11-25 at 8.21.54 AM

 

Oliver’s been rescued

 

OLIVER 3 FREEDOM PHOTO

Oliver exiting the shelter

 

OLIVER 3 WITH NEW MOM

 

Oliver’s freedom photo

 

ABIGAIL RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-11-26 at 6.42.40 AM

 

Abigail has been rescued

 

ABIGAIL FREEDOM PHOTO

 

Abigail’s freedom photo

 

ABIGAIL FREEDOM RIDE

 

Abigail’s freedom ride

 

THATCHER RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-11-26 at 6.52.31 AM

 

Thatcher has been rescued

 

THATCHER FREEDOM PHOTO

 

Thatcher’s freedom photo

 

 

BEAN RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-11-28 at 5.59.16 AM

 

Bean has been rescued

 

BEAN FREEDOM PHOTO

 

Bean’s freedom photo

 

BIANCA 2 RESCUED

 

Bianca has been rescued

 

BIANCA 2 FREEDOM PHOTO

 

Bianca’s freedom photo

PRIMANTI RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-11-30 at 6.20.24 AM

 

Primanti has been rescued

 

PRIMANTI FREEDOM PHOTO

 

Primanti’s freedom photo

CARLOS 3 RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-01 at 5.52.18 AM

 

Carlos has been rescued

 

CARLOS 3 FREEDOM RIDE

 

Carlos’ freedom ride

 

CARLOS 3 FREEDOM PHOTO

Carlos’ freedom photo

 

ABRIELLA RESCUED

Abriella has been rescued

 

ABRIELLA FREEDOM PHOTO

 

Abriella’s freedom photo

 

ABRIELLA'S FREEDOM RIDE

 

Abriella’s freedom ride

STACEY RESCUED

 

Stacey has been rescued

 

STACEY FREEDOM PHOTO

Stacey’s freedom photo

 

MARCO RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-02 at 2.41.03 PM copy

 

Marco has been rescued

 

MARCO FREEDOM PHOTO ON RIGHT Screen Shot 2017-12-02 at 2.40.17 PM copy

Marco’s freedom video on the right. At the vet getting taken good care of.

 

CLYDE RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-03 at 6.07.05 AM copy

 

Clyde has been rescued

 

CLYDE FREEDOM PHOTO copy

 

Clyde’s freedom photo

 

PARKER RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-05 at 9.02.33 AM

 

Parker has been rescued

 

PARKER FREEDOM PHOTO

 

Parker’s freedom photo

 

TYLER RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-05 at 9.17.08 AM

 

Tyler has been rescued

 

TYLER FREEDOM PHOTO

 

Tyler’s freedom photo

 

NITRO RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-05 at 9.29.36 AM

 

Nitro has been rescued

NITRO FREEDOM PHOTO

 

Nitro’s freedom photo

 

AISHA RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-05 at 8.12.15 PM

 

Aisha’s been rescued

 

AISHA FREEDOM PHOTO

Aisha’s freedom photo

 

PAXTON 2 RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-06 at 5.28.51 AM

 

Paxton has been rescued

 

PAXTON 2 FREEDOM

 

Paxton’s freedom photo

 

ALANNAH RESCUED

 

Alannah has been rescued

 

ALANNAH FREEDOMAlannah’s freedom photo

 

BACCHUS RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-06 at 5.44.58 AM

 

 

Bacchus has been rescued

 

BACCHUS FREEDOM

 

Bacchus’ freedom photo

 

NEWTON RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-09 at 10.52.33 AM

 

Newton has been rescued

 

NEWTON FREEDOM PHOTO

Newton’s freedom photo

 

BLITZ RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-09 at 10.52.09 AM

 

Blitz has been rescued

 

BLITZ FREEDOM PHOTO

 

Blitz’s freedom photo

 

ALBERT RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-09 at 10.52.57 AM

 

Albert has been rescued

ALBERT FREEDOM PHOTO

Albert’s freedom photo

 

ALLY FROM RAMONA ANIMAL SHELTER

Ally (named by rescue) has been rescued

 

ALLY FREEDOM PHOTO

 

Ally’s freedom photo

 

WYATT RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-09 at 11.24.55 AM

Wyatt has been rescued

 

WYATT FREEDOM RIDE

Wyatt’s freedom ride

 

WYATT FREEDOM PHOTO.jpg

Wyatt’s freedom photo

 

WYATT W: NEW MOM

Wyatt bonding with new mom

 

ALDO RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-10 at 5.50.32 AM

 

Aldo has been rescued

 

ALDO FREEDOM PHOTO

Aldo’s freedom photo

 

TRAPPER RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-10 at 5.53.08 AM

 

Trapper has been rescued

 

TRAPPER FREEDOM PHOTO

 

Trapper’s freedom photo

 

BLISS RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-10 at 11.17.48 AM

Bliss has been rescued

 

BLISS FREEDOM PHOTO CAR RIDE

 

Bliss’ freedom photo car ride

 

CARLA RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-11 at 4.38.24 PM

Carla has been rescued

 

CARLA FREEDOM PHOTO

 

Carla’s freedom photo

 

RAISER RESCUED Screen Shot 2017-12-12 at 8.45.37 AM.png

Raider has been rescued

 

RAIDER FREEDOM PHOTO

 

Raider’s freedom photo

 

BROWNIE 17248 RESCUED

Brownie (named by rescue) has been rescued

 

BROWNIE FREEDOM PHOTO

Brownie’s freedom photo

 

BROWNIE IN NEW HOME SWEET HOME

Brownie settling into new home sweet home

 

BROWNIE THANKING NEW MOM

Brownie’s thank you for saving my life

About The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap

The year 1895 was filled with memorable historical events: the Dreyfus Affair divided France; Booker T. Washington gave his Atlanta address; Richard Olney, United States Secretary of State, expanded the effects of the Monroe Doctrine in settling a boundary dispute between the United Kingdom and Venezuela; and Oscar Wilde was tried and convicted for "gross indecency" under Britian's recently passed law that made sex between males a criminal offense. When the news of Wilde's conviction went out over telegraphs worldwide, it threw a small Nevada town into chaos. This is the story of what happened when the lives of its citizens were impacted by the news of Oscar Wildes' imprisonment. It is chronicle of hatred and prejudice with all its unintended and devastating consequences, and how love and friendship bring strength and healing. Paulette Mahurin, the author, is a Nurse Practitioner who lives in Ojai, California with her husband Terry and their two dogs--- Max and Bella. She practices women's health in a rural clinic and writes in her spare time. All profits from her book are going to animal rescue, Santa Paula Animal Shelter, the first and only no-kill shelter in Ventura County, CA, where she lives. (see links below on Ventura County Star Article & Shelter) To find out more please go the The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap on facebook or Amazon or e-mail us at the gavatar addresses. Thank you. (photos: of Paulette, her family, and a reading at The Ojai Art Center, July 2012)
This entry was posted in ABOUT THE BOOK, ACTS OF KINDNESS, AMAZON RANKING, ANIMAL RESCUE, DOGS RESCUED, HIS NAME WAS BEN, REVIEW: TO LIVE OUT LOUD, REVIEWS, REVIEWS FOR HIS NAME WAS BEN, REVIEWS: HIS NAME WAS BEN, REVIEWS: THE PERSECUTION OF MILDRED DUNLAP, THE DAY I SAW THE HUMMINGBIRD, THE DREYFUS AFFAIR, THE SEVEN YEAR DRESS, TO LIVE OUT LOUD, TOLERANCE, WHERE TO BUY. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to 877 dogs rescued from kill shelters

  1. The people who organise their freedom and the people who take them into their homes are rewarded many times over by the love these dogs have to share.

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