120 dogs rescued from kill shelters

I’m deeply grateful to everyone who has purchased, read, and taken the time to review one of my books. All profits from my books go to help get dogs like Dagwood, Albert, Opie, Bette, Salinger, Scarlett, Truimph, Brenda, Braden, Maggie, Archer, Snaggle, Blackie and Chester (see photos below) out of kill shelters. So far in 2018, 120 dogs have been rescued. In 2017 we’ve helped free 904 dogs. In 2016, 250 dogs were freed. In 2015, 148 dogs were freed.

AND please for everyone who’s purchased a book could I humbly ask you to write a review when you’ve completed the read.  Amazon promotes and ranks books according to number of reviews in addition to sales. Every voice helps spread the word and that is an energy that can help a dog.

LINK TO PURCHASE ALL MY BOOKS and to see all reviews for all my books click on the books cover:

AMAZON U.S.

AMAZON U.K.
And on all other Amazon sites around the world.
AMAZON RANKING
My books have been ranked in the top 100 best sellers on Amazon U.S. in their categories (historical fiction, teen and young adult, and literary fiction).  What an honor to be ranked #87  LITERARY FICTION BEST SELLER next to Paulo Coelho; incredible author of The Alchemist and The Pilgrimage.
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Amazon Australia ranked my book NUMBER ONE in all it’s categories: Literary Fiction, Historical Fiction & Teen and Young Adult and is #3 best seller in the entire kindle bookstore.
AMAZON AU BEST SELLER Screen Shot 2017-06-01 at 6.13.16 AM
AMAZON AU #1 LITERARY FICTION Screen Shot 2017-06-01 at 6.11.45 AM
AMAZON AU #1 HISTORICAL FICTION
AMAZON AU #1 TEEN AND YOUNG ADULT
AMAZON U.K. #1 TEEN AND YOUNG ADULT Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 12.34.07 PM copy
#3 BEST SELLER IN THE ENTIRE KINDLE STORE Screen Shot 2017-06-01 at 6.25.27 AM copy
And in Amazon U.K. it just made it to#1 Best Seller List in Teen & Young Adult Category and #3 in Historical Fiction Category and #24 best seller in the kindle books store.
 # 1 AMAZON U.K. BEST SELLER
AMAZON UK #1 #3 #3 kindle bookstore #24 Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 2.58.36 PM copy
 AMAZON U.K. #1 TEEN AND YOUNG ADULT Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 12.34.07 PM copy
 AMAZON U.K. HISTORICAL LITERARY FICTION # 3 Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 10.19.07 AM copy
RECENT REVIEWS FOR THE DAY I SAW THE HUMMINGBIRD
AMAZON U.S.
on March 29, 2018
What an emotional roller coaster and, yes – there were tears. What was life like for a young slave? Read this book and you’ll see it all – the good; the bad; and the really bad. The author does a wonderful job in this historical depiction of the south at a time when freedom was a bad word. 5/5 stars means I loved it!

The book begins and ends in 1914, when Oscar Mercer attends a talk given by Booker T. Washington honoring Harriet Tubman, the woman responsible for coordinating the Underground Railway and, therefore, securing Oscar’s freedom.

Oscar reminisces about his life, from his birth in 1852 into a life of slavery until the time he gains his freedom, aged ten. As a child, he stands by helplessly as friends and family members suffer the cruelty inflicted by the plantation’s foreman. When he is five, the slaves start hearing tales of “a Negro woman who was working with a group to help free slaves.” That woman is Harriet Tubman. We never meet her, but her presence runs through the narrative. Another milestone in Oscar’s life is when he gets the opportunity to learn how to read and write. He is drawn to comment, “Why do learning things feel so good?” Then, on the day he sees the hummingbird in the field, a chain of events is set into motion that ends in tragic consequences but eventually leads to his freedom. Armed with a Bible, a dictionary, and the skills taught to him by “conductors” with the Underground Railway, Oscar finally makes it to freedom. It is a gruelling journey from Louisiana to New York City, during which his faith is tested and he learns the true meaning of freedom.

Throughout, Oscar maintains his spirit and resolve by recalling his mother’s words of wisdom: “My mama’s womb had given me life, but it was her wisdom implanted in my brain that kept me alive.” She imbues in him the belief that “Skin color don’t make us no less a person.” This belief is reinforced when he meets the many (white) people who are willing to help him on his trip along the Underground Railway: “I was overwhelmed with relief when I realized that people are people. Simple as that. And the color of my skin doesn’t make me less of a person. It doesn’t separate or define my humanness. No, what makes some less human is hatred and hateful actions.”

In the Foreword, the author gives us some background into how she came to write this story: “In many southern states, educating slaves to read or write was illegal. […] I incorporated the element of educating slaves into this story and, in particular, with the protagonist and narrator of the story. […] Many of the scenes depicted were adapted from historical notes, letters, and other documentation from slaves who lived to tell their stories.” She succeeds admirably in giving us a look into the psyche of the young slave Oscar and rendering a heartbreaking account of the atrocities committed in the name of greed and prejudice.

Oscar’s story will haunt you for a long time after you have finished reading.

I received this book in return for an honest review.

on March 24, 2018
What an engaging, emotional, and informative book! I love historical fiction, and this book did not disappoint. Oscar’s story is poignant and touching, and I felt an emotional connection to him from the very beginning of the story. The tragic events surrounding his parents were hard to read but added to the reality of life under slavery. This book is grounded in real events, and I can tell that the author is very knowledgeable and did a lot of research on the time period. Recommended!
GOODREADS:

Carol

Mar 24, 2018 Carol rated it it was amazing

The Day I Saw the Hummingbird is both a journey and a coming of age novel about Oscar, a nine-year-old enslaved boy traveling the Underground Railroad from a Louisiana sugar cane plantation to New York.

Author Paulette Mahurin tells this story from the perspective an adult looking back at his childhood, so we know at the outset that Oscar survives the journey. Though this approach keeps us at arm’s length from some of the emotion of the story, arm’s length may be a good place to be as events unfold and we see how vicious and violent the journey to freedom could be. In this respect, the story reminded me of the book version of Solomon Northup’s memoir “Twelve Years A Slave.”

In the course of this story, we not only learn about Oscar’s life, we also meet “conductors” on the railroad and experience a number of safe houses. With each contact, Oscar receives not only shelter and food, but also friendship and an education that includes everything from swimming, to reading and writing, to human kindness. I’ve always been awestruck by Harriett Tubman and others who put their lives on the line to help others. After reading this novel, I admire these brave souls even more. Mahurin made good use of research for this book as she has in her other historical novels.

I recommend this book for anyone wanting to know more about the Underground Railroad. Be aware, though, you’ll encounter graphic violence

REVIEWS FOR THE SEVEN YEAR DRESS
AMAZON U.S.
on March 24, 2018
Heartbreaking story , written so beautifully , you almost can feel the fabric….a story of the human spirit and love rising above devastation ..I loved the description , so vivid . Very sad at times, and even a bit disturbing , but a story thst you will remember always
AMAZON U.K.
on 25 March 2018
This book was one I just couldn’t put down. It was very well written and shines with love throughout, along with the fortitude both inward and outward of one human being and her determination to survive.
GOODREADS

Catherine Brown

Mar 25, 2018 Catherine Brown *****rated it it was amazing
Wow, I need something totally different after reading this book. What an account of the terrors of Nazi Germany. A well told story, if rather harrowing.
DOGS RESCUED FROM KILL SHELTERS
DAGWOOD RESCUED Screen Shot 2018-03-21 at 4.14.21 PM
Dagwood has been rescued
DAGWOOD FREEDOM
Dagwood’s freedom photo
ALBERT RESCUED Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 3.19.30 PM
Albert has been rescued
ALBERT FREEDOM VID UNABLE DOWNLOAD Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 3.22.37 PM
Albert’s freedom video. I was unable to download it.
OPIE RESCUED Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 6.54.21 PM
Opie has been rescued
OPIE FREEDOM PHOTO
Opie’s freedom photo
BETTE 2 RESCUED Screen Shot 2018-03-23 at 12.36.35 PM
Bette has been rescued
BETTE 2 FREEDOM PHOTO
Bette’s freedom photo
SALINGER RESCUED Screen Shot 2018-03-25 at 8.35.56 AM
Salinger has been rescued
SALINGER FREEDOM
Salinger’s freedom photo
SCARLETT 2 RESCUED Screen Shot 2018-03-25 at 8.34.07 AM
Scarlette’s been rescued
SCARLETT 2 FREEDOM
Scarlett’s freedom photo
TRIUMPH 2 aka TRIP RESCUED Screen Shot 2018-03-25 at 3.06.48 PM
Triumph’s been rescued
TRIUMPH 2 aka TRIP FREEDOM
Triumph’s freedom photo
BRENDA 1 RESCUED Screen Shot 2018-03-26 at 5.42.36 AM
Brenda has been rescued
BRENDA 1 FREEDOM PHOTO
Brenda’s freedom photo
BRAYDEN ask FLASH RESCUED Screen Shot 2018-03-27 at 3.11.49 PM
Braden has been rescued
BRAYDEN aka FLASH FREEDOM
Braden’s freedom photo
MAGGIE 3 RESCUED
Maggie has been rescued
MAGGIE 3 FREEDOM
Maggie’s freedom photo
ARCHER aka MAX RESCUED Screen Shot 2018-03-28 at 6.39.34 AM
Archer has been rescued
ARCHER aka MAX FREEDOM PHOTO
Archer’s freedom photo
SNAGGLE RESCUED Screen Shot 2018-03-28 at 10.02.51 AM
Snaggle has been rescued
SNAGGLE FREEDOM
Snaggle’s freedom photo
BLACKIE 1 RESCUED Screen Shot 2018-03-28 at 4.52.29 PM
Blackie has been rescued. And bless the rescue that saved this blind and deaf dog. (The Kris Kelly Fdn)
BLACKIE 1 FREEDOM DEAF & BLIND
Blackie’s freedom photo
 CHESTER 2 aka SAILOR RESCUED Screen Shot 2018-03-29 at 5.46.37 AM
Chester (renamed Sailor by Main Street Mutt rescue) has been rescued
CHESTER 2 aka SAILOR FREEDOM
Chester now Sailor’s freedom photo

About The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap

The year 1895 was filled with memorable historical events: the Dreyfus Affair divided France; Booker T. Washington gave his Atlanta address; Richard Olney, United States Secretary of State, expanded the effects of the Monroe Doctrine in settling a boundary dispute between the United Kingdom and Venezuela; and Oscar Wilde was tried and convicted for "gross indecency" under Britian's recently passed law that made sex between males a criminal offense. When the news of Wilde's conviction went out over telegraphs worldwide, it threw a small Nevada town into chaos. This is the story of what happened when the lives of its citizens were impacted by the news of Oscar Wildes' imprisonment. It is chronicle of hatred and prejudice with all its unintended and devastating consequences, and how love and friendship bring strength and healing. Paulette Mahurin, the author, is a Nurse Practitioner who lives in Ojai, California with her husband Terry and their two dogs--- Max and Bella. She practices women's health in a rural clinic and writes in her spare time. All profits from her book are going to animal rescue, Santa Paula Animal Shelter, the first and only no-kill shelter in Ventura County, CA, where she lives. (see links below on Ventura County Star Article & Shelter) To find out more please go the The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap on facebook or Amazon or e-mail us at the gavatar addresses. Thank you. (photos: of Paulette, her family, and a reading at The Ojai Art Center, July 2012)
This entry was posted in ABOUT THE BOOK, ACTS OF KINDNESS, AMAZON, AMAZON RANKING, ANIMAL RESCUE, DOGS RESCUED, HIS NAME WAS BEN, INTOLERANCE, PHOTOS, PROMO, REVIEW: TO LIVE OUT LOUD, REVIEWS, REVIEWS FOR HIS NAME WAS BEN, REVIEWS: HIS NAME WAS BEN, REVIEWS: THE PERSECUTION OF MILDRED DUNLAP, THE DAY I SAW THE HUMMINGBIRD, THE DREYFUS AFFAIR, THE SEVEN YEAR DRESS, TO LIVE OUT LOUD, TOLERANCE, WHERE TO BUY. Bookmark the permalink.

42 Responses to 120 dogs rescued from kill shelters

  1. tazzielove says:

    Great on the dogs and reviews.

  2. Dear Blackie! So glad he has made it.

    • Blackie has a massive fan club and is feeling the love. He’s a sweetie and from all I’m hearing is very happy. Thank goodness there are so many kind-hearted people in this world of ours. Wishing you, Leo and gang a good weekend and Happy Easter. ❤

  3. Bless you for your advocacy for rescues! 💖

  4. davidprosser says:

    You’re doing an amazing job. Thank you.
    Massive Hugs

  5. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    Profits from Paulette Mahurin’s books go to help rescue dogs from kill shelters. In this post you will see just some of the 120 dogs rescued in the first three months of 2018.. safe and given the love they deserve. You will see from the reviews that Paulette’s books are much enjoyed and she is an inspiring example of how one person can make a difference. #recommended

  6. Tina Frisco says:

    Bless you for your good work, Paulette ❤

  7. What a great way to start my Easter weekend – seeing a bunch of happy, rescued dogs!

  8. You are surrounded by furry angels.

  9. You’re doing a wonderful thing for those dogs!

  10. Allthough we love to see all the happy doggies, we now have a crush on Bette. She’s adorable ❤ Pawkisses for a Happy Hoppy Easter, dear Paulette 🙂 ❤

    • Bless your sweethearts, yes she is a lovely older doggie girl. And thank goodness she was rescued to live our her days surrounded with love. Happy Easter to you and grannie and all your beautiful family. Sending this with tons of pawkisses. ❤

  11. Lara/Trace says:

    You are the GOOD in this world. I send you love ❤

  12. Saba-Thambi says:

    Congratulations on your book launch. Best wishes
    Saba

  13. Wow, how your blog has grown! Great clips and reviews and I absolutely love your dog pics! You are doing a great work with assisting the release of mistreated dogs!

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