What are readers saying about Irma’s Endgame

It’s always a nerve-racking time for an author when a new book is released. A few reviews are in for my new book,  Irma’s Endgame, and I’m happy to say the responses are favorable. With all my profits going to help get dogs out of kill shelters, I am especially invested in promoting my books to help achieve freedom for as many dogs as possible. Not an easy feat when two are freed and three dumped into the shelters. The demand far outweighs the resources. This is not just with dogs in kill shelters but so many others (animals and humans) in dire need of helping assistance. One simple act change change a life. And so it is with this intent, I share my blog posts, promote my books, and brave my self-consciousness. Amazon promotes books based on sales and number of reviews. I humbly and wholeheartedly ask you, my cyber family, if you have purchased, read, and liked, any of my books could you please post a review? And if you have the time, interest, and comfort could you help spread the word that you have an author friend who writes books that helps free dogs from kill shelters. To all who have already purchased one of my books, written a review, or helped spread the word I humbly thank you. To date we’ve collectively helped free 2,192 dogs. All before and after photos of these dogs have been featured on my blog site.

 

IRMA’S ENDGAME

 

PURCHASE LINK:

AMAZON U.S.   https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07QZM22W3/

AMAZON U.K. https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07QZM22W3

And all other Amazon stores around the world

 

RECENT REVIEWS

 

bookworm81

May 8, 2019

Format: Kindle Edition

 

 

Oregongirl

April 28, 2019

Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase

 

 

AMAZON U.K.

jeanniell

29 April 2019

Format: Kindle Edition
Verified purchase Amazon.fr
What if the human heart was not just a mechanical pump in the body, an organ with purely physiological properties? What if it were something altogether more complex and mysterious?
When renowned transplant surgeon Peter Dayton removes the heart from the victim of a road traffic accident, Lexi Parkhouse, and transplants it into the dying body of Jeffrey Kincaide, a chain of events is set in motion with devastating consequences. In the sumptuous Bel Air mansion that is home to the wealthy Kincaide family, the couple’s previous domestic harmony turns sour as Jeffrey recuperates with his new heart. Initially overcome with gratitude at the miraculous intervention that saved her husband’s life, Amelia Kincaide, becomes increasingly disturbed by what she perceives as abnormal changes in him, changes that inspire suspicion and hatred. At the same time, Lexi’s grieving widower, Randolf Parkhouse, is struggling unsuccessfully to get over the loss of the woman he loved. In an attempt find solace, he starts to explore far-fetched, quasi-spiritual notions about communion with the dead, becoming gradually convinced that he is still somehow connected to his wife, whose presence lingers on earth through the heart which now beats in the chest of Randolf.
Unaware of all this, surgeon Peter Dayton continues to operate. He is a man who, on the surface, has everything–money, prestige, a brilliant career and international reputation–but, apart from his job and his affection for his dog, Bella, he is carrying out a meaningless existence in a loveless marriage, consumed by regret for the woman he loved and lost years ago through his own bad choices. Unknown to him, that woman, Irma Mullins, is about to enter his life once more when she opens a newspaper and reads that her former lover has been arrested on charges of killing one of his patients. ‘Involuntary manslaughter…’ Shocked to the core, Irma has no doubt as to her ex-lover’s innocence, and, convinced he is the victim of a vendetta, determines to clear his name.
What starts as a classic, suspenseful whodunnit gradually turns into something far more complex and multi-layered. Author Paulette Mahurin puts her characters under the microscope, scrutinising what is going on in their ‘hearts’ in the wider sense of the term, dissecting in forensic detail the way they live, their innermost feelings and passions, how their backgrounds have shaped their personalities, the motivations behind their behaviour and, more immediately, their reactions as events unfold with a frightening inevitability, sweeping them along like a flash flood. The tempestuous rumblings in their personal stories are eerily mirrored in what is happening on a planetary scale. Global political and economic upheaval, growing social divides in Western societies, the devastation raging in war torn countries, the apparent increase in extreme weather events–all these contribute to an ominous feeling that the world is off kilter, out of balance, chaotic. We sense that things are slipping beyond our control, our belief in the rational, the scientific, the provable, is shaken, our certainties over-turned. As Irma remarks, becoming more and more stressed by the agonising drag of the legal process and the seeming impossibility of altering its course, it is ‘like trying to mold pottery with over-wet material while in handcuffs.’ The tension builds as the characters react to the growing pressure (I found myself experiencing sympathetic stomach pains), with even those most convinced of Peter’s innocence, including himself, beginning to have doubts.
By crafting such detailed portraits of her characters and their growing emotional turmoil, Mahurin anchors her story in the real, the every-day, and is thus able to give credibility to the incredible, when at last Irma’s team begin to make progress, discovering a thread which, unbelievable as it may appear, offers a chance of building a solid case in Pete’s defence: ‘a small, barely visible thread that (leads) to a Sherman tank.’
It’s impossible to do justice to all the admirable qualities of this author’s latest work in a short review. Suffice it to say that that ‘Irma’s Endgame’ is one of those books which not only keeps us captivated until the last page, but also prompts us to ask questions about our own lives, the mistakes we make, the paths we choose and their validity, and our dimly perceived apprehension of the greater truth behind Hamlet’s words: ‘There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamed of in your philosophy.’

 

About The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap

The year 1895 was filled with memorable historical events: the Dreyfus Affair divided France; Booker T. Washington gave his Atlanta address; Richard Olney, United States Secretary of State, expanded the effects of the Monroe Doctrine in settling a boundary dispute between the United Kingdom and Venezuela; and Oscar Wilde was tried and convicted for "gross indecency" under Britian's recently passed law that made sex between males a criminal offense. When the news of Wilde's conviction went out over telegraphs worldwide, it threw a small Nevada town into chaos. This is the story of what happened when the lives of its citizens were impacted by the news of Oscar Wildes' imprisonment. It is chronicle of hatred and prejudice with all its unintended and devastating consequences, and how love and friendship bring strength and healing. Paulette Mahurin, the author, is a Nurse Practitioner who lives in Ojai, California with her husband Terry and their two dogs--- Max and Bella. She practices women's health in a rural clinic and writes in her spare time. All profits from her book are going to animal rescue, Santa Paula Animal Shelter, the first and only no-kill shelter in Ventura County, CA, where she lives. (see links below on Ventura County Star Article & Shelter) To find out more please go the The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap on facebook or Amazon or e-mail us at the gavatar addresses. Thank you. (photos: of Paulette, her family, and a reading at The Ojai Art Center, July 2012)
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14 Responses to What are readers saying about Irma’s Endgame

  1. TYPOS have been corrected. My apologies for the email version with typos in it.

  2. natuurfreak2 says:

    Ziet er een heel goed boek uit en hoop dat de verkoop zal pieken

  3. Pingback: What are readers saying about Irma’s Endgame – ❧Defining Ways❧

  4. I look forward to this read. I am not surprised it has raving reviews. SHARED.

  5. 👍🏻You’re always No. 1 with us!

  6. Cinta says:

    Reblogged this on Amisdetente and commented:
    What if the human heart was not just a mechanical pump in the body, an organ with purely physiological properties? What if it were something altogether more complex and mysterious?
    When renowned transplant surgeon Peter Dayton removes the heart from the victim of a road traffic accident, Lexi Parkhouse, and transplants it into the dying body of Jeffrey Kincaide, a chain of events is set in motion with devastating consequences. In the sumptuous Bel Air mansion that is home to the wealthy Kincaide family, the couple’s previous domestic harmony turns sour as Jeffrey recuperates with his new heart. Initially overcome with gratitude at the miraculous intervention that saved her husband’s life, Amelia Kincaide, becomes increasingly disturbed by what she perceives as abnormal changes in him, changes that inspire suspicion and hatred. At the same time, Lexi’s grieving widower, Randolf Parkhouse, is struggling unsuccessfully to get over the loss of the woman he loved. In an attempt find solace, he starts to explore far-fetched, quasi-spiritual notions about communion with the dead, becoming gradually convinced that he is still somehow connected to his wife, whose presence lingers on earth through the heart which now beats in the chest of Randolf.
    Unaware of all this, surgeon Peter Dayton continues to operate. He is a man who, on the surface, has everything–money, prestige, a brilliant career and international reputation–but, apart from his job and his affection for his dog, Bella, he is carrying out a meaningless existence in a loveless marriage, consumed by regret for the woman he loved and lost years ago through his own bad choices. Unknown to him, that woman, Irma Mullins, is about to enter his life once more when she opens a newspaper and reads that her former lover has been arrested on charges of killing one of his patients. ‘Involuntary manslaughter…’ Shocked to the core, Irma has no doubt as to her ex-lover’s innocence, and, convinced he is the victim of a vendetta, determines to clear his name.
    What starts as a classic, suspenseful whodunnit gradually turns into something far more complex and multi-layered. Author Paulette Mahurin puts her characters under the microscope, scrutinising what is going on in their ‘hearts’ in the wider sense of the term, dissecting in forensic detail the way they live, their innermost feelings and passions, how their backgrounds have shaped their personalities, the motivations behind their behaviour and, more immediately, their reactions as events unfold with a frightening inevitability, sweeping them along like a flash flood. The tempestuous rumblings in their personal stories are eerily mirrored in what is happening on a planetary scale. Global political and economic upheaval, growing social divides in Western societies, the devastation raging in war torn countries, the apparent increase in extreme weather events–all these contribute to an ominous feeling that the world is off kilter, out of balance, chaotic. We sense that things are slipping beyond our control, our belief in the rational, the scientific, the provable, is shaken, our certainties over-turned. As Irma remarks, becoming more and more stressed by the agonising drag of the legal process and the seeming impossibility of altering its course, it is ‘like trying to mold pottery with over-wet material while in handcuffs.’ The tension builds as the characters react to the growing pressure (I found myself experiencing sympathetic stomach pains), with even those most convinced of Peter’s innocence, including himself, beginning to have doubts.
    By crafting such detailed portraits of her characters and their growing emotional turmoil, Mahurin anchors her story in the real, the every-day, and is thus able to give credibility to the incredible, when at last Irma’s team begin to make progress, discovering a thread which, unbelievable as it may appear, offers a chance of building a solid case in Pete’s defence: ‘a small, barely visible thread that (leads) to a Sherman tank.’
    It’s impossible to do justice to all the admirable qualities of this author’s latest work in a short review. Suffice it to say that that ‘Irma’s Endgame’ is one of those books which not only keeps us captivated until the last page, but also prompts us to ask questions about our own lives, the mistakes we make, the paths we choose and their validity, and our dimly perceived apprehension of the greater truth behind Hamlet’s words: ‘There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamed of in your philosophy.’

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