Home Sweet Home and another thing

I’ll be away from blogging for a while. Not that I blog that much but I enjoy visiting sites and keeping in touch. Going to take care of a well needed situation. So if you don’t see me hanging around your site, I haven’t stopped paying attention. I just may not be able to get to a computer and don’t have a smart phone. The only thing smart in this household is our dogs.

And speaking of dogs look who has made it out of a kill shelter and gone home sweet home this week. Oh happy dance!

Lily was found skin and bones in a kill shelter. Now she's home sweet home and plumping up.

When Lily was found she was skin and bones. Now she’s home sweet home and plumping up.

Bessie rescued

Bessie has found a home and is now feeling the love.

Ben rescued from Baldwin Shelter

Ben with his new loving mom.

A very ill and scared Moonpie rescued and being medically taken care of

A very ill and scared Moonpie was rescued. She is being medically taken care of and is doing better physically & emotionally.

14 year old Lucky was rescued

14 year old Lucky got lucky. This is his freedom ride to his new home.

All profits from my books go to help get these dogs out of kill shelters. Thank you to everyone who bought a book and took the time to write a review. We’re all grateful for the support.

Where to purchase my books:

THE PERSECUTION OF MILDRED DUNLAP:
http://www.amazon.com/Persecution-Mildred-Dunlap-Paulette-Mahurin-ebook/dp/B008K9DV4U/ref=cm_cr_pr_pb_i
TO LIVE OUT LOUD:

http://www.amazon.com/Live-Out-Loud-Novel-ebook/dp/B012XXTRS2/ref=la_B008MMDUGO_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1438210990&sr=1-3
   HIS NAME WAS BEN:
http://www.amazon.com/His-Name-was-Paulette-Mahurin/dp/0692264698/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1411266674&sr=8-1&keywords=His+name+was+ben+by+paulette+mahurin

Some recent reviews:

on August 29, 2015

In To Live Out Loud, award-winning author Mahruin gives us a stunning portrayal of the personal, emotional and struggle of Emile Zola leading up to and during his journalistic support of Alfred Dreyfus, which ended with his agonizing temporary exile from his beloved France. Through the eyes of a close friend and confidant, Charles Mandonette, we are gifted with not only a reminder of the journalistic morality of France’s most recognized journalist, but also the most amazing relationship between these two men. Though the novel retells well known events of Zolas emotional defense of Alfred Dreyfus, Mahurin skillfully builds drama, transforming what could have been a simple retelling of history into a page-turner, filled with love, loss, and a very tangible humanity. My heart went out to Mandonette as he watched the inevitable downfall of the m

on August 30, 2015
‘To Live Out Loud’ was such an intriguing read. I honestly did not know much about the Alfred Dreyfus case of treason, but I have loved everything Paulette has written and it sounded very interesting so I was happy to check it out.
The story was well written and was rather captivating. Not only did Paulette tell the story in a very intriguing way, but she also teaches the reader about a historical event that not everybody knows all the details of, I sure didn’t.
‘To Live Out Loud’ was a nice combination of fiction and fact to makes a great story. I really enjoyed this book and I highly recommend Paulette’s work.

an he admits to loving to the exclusion of all others. The novel is especially relevant in our times when it seems journalism has lost some of its truth. Excellent job. Now I’m off to get Mahurin’s award-winning historical, The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap.

on August 30, 2015
Stories about social justice deserve to be heard, especially when based on truth. ‘To Live Out Loud’ is no exception. In 1895 Alfred Dreyfus a young Jewish artillery officer was falsely accused of treason and court martialled in France and condemned to a life sentence on Devil’s Island in French Guiana. The trial and retrial, characterised by anti-Semitism, and political and military cover-up and deception, deeply divided French society and attracted international outrage. A French journalist, Émile Zola fought for Dreyfus’ liberty by penning J’Accuse, which named the officers responsible for the conspiracy. Paulette Mahurin reveals the heroic courage of Zola, who in his selfless bid to uncover the truth and free Dreyfus, exposes himself to libel, abuse and physical danger. The author tells Zola’s story through the eyes of an older fictionalised friend who has known him since he was a young boy, helping readers to fully understand and appreciate Zola.

I loved the quotes from Zola heading the chapters which revealed his talent and insight with lines such as ‘how fragile the ethics of civilised conduct are when involved in self-preservation’ and ‘respectable people … What bastards’.

This short but powerful story is told simply but with overwhelming humanity and deep empathy. You can’t help but feel for the characters’ plights and feel the outrage of injustice. Everyone should hear stories like this a

on August 30, 2015
This great book takes the reader into a divided French society. Players dig in their positions and battle it out, stooping to great depths, from the military to the Church, the battlefield being the fate of a man falsely sentenced to life. Within this conflict, Ms. Mahurin focuses on Human Nature as her subject, drawing the reader into the personal struggles and qualities, making this more than an academic study of the Dreyfus Affair. This is a fantastic story.
The short novel is full of solid dialogue and tension. Which made To Live Out Loud as entertaining as it was informative. As much as I love a fun read, the depth of this subject and the importance of this historical event left me feeling as though I needed to read this book. I’m glad I did. It get a full five stars from me. And I recommend it wholly.

nd remember them.

Posted in ACTS OF KINDNESS, ANIMAL RESCUE, Canine Adoption Rescue League, DOGS & CATS GOING HOME, DOGS RESCUED, EMILE ZOLA, REVIEWS | Tagged , , , | 40 Comments

Cancer survivor reviews His Name Was Ben

on August 22, 2015
Sara has cancer, Ben has cancer; they meet when they are both referred for the same drug trial. It’s a trial for those patients who have few or no other options. This is the start of the story so the reader expects a rough ride but actually what follows is a lesson in what we all should do, sick or otherwise; live for the moment, never expect life to stop offering something good even in the gravest of times, and when it does… Grab it!
Both Sara and Ben have parental issues but they also have good friends and loving relationships in their lives. Sara has a stalwart friend, Ellen who has supported her tirelessly through her illness. Ben has a brother he is close to. But when Sara spots Ben she instinctively senses that she has a chance at love, maybe a last chance and she aggressively orchestrates a meeting with him in a way that might have seemed quite contrived in some chick-lit rom-com. However her moves are so significant in this story based on true life. Sara has learned the hard way that life’s opportunities should never be wasted, a lesson that many of those who beat cancer carry with them for the rest of their lives.
Sara contacts Ben.
The account is sad but happy and very uplifting. Faced with this story to tell the author has given a fearlessly straightforward account of the highs and lows of this dreadful disease and recreated the beautiful side of what can happen to courageous people.
I am a cancer survivor. It was a long time ago. I don’t dwell on it but I never forget how lucky I am.
 LATEST REVIEWS FOR TO LIVE OUT LOUD
AMAZON.COM (U.S.)
on August 25, 2015

Paulette Mahurin brings her own stance to the controversy about Emile Zola that centred on the question of the guilt or innocence of army captain Alfred Dreyfus, who had been convicted of treason for selling secrets to the Germans -allegedly To .Live Out Loud pulls at your heart strings as Zola tries to right a wrong only to find himself convicted of libel.

Written in the first person with the protagonist Charles Mandonette, Mahurin tells us the story of a man seeking justice, his thoughts, actions and the obstacles he faces in a time when France finds itself divided.

To LIve Out Loud is a brilliantly crafted piece of work that will hold your attention from start to finish.

on August 25, 2015

This historical fiction is a wonderfully written account of Emile Zola’s attempt to convey to the world the coverup in the Dreyfus Affair. Despite knowing he was going against powerful military, political, and religious leaders, Zola stood up for what he believed was right, hoping against the odds that people and the court would judge fairly. If you don’t know the outcome, read the book. You will be touched, angered, and saddened by the events that plagued Zola.

This book and others like this should be must reads for schools. If all history was presented to youth in such a manner, rather than cold, hard facts, they would be more likely to not only retain that knowledge, but also enjoy it so much more. And not only that, but perhaps they would learn about values and what it means to stand up for what you believe is truth.

To Live Out Loud by Paulette Mahurin grips the reader with Emile Zola’s quotes as much as it does by Paulette Mahurin’s brilliant writing. The First voice narration of Charles Mandonette was an ingenious way to relate the story; a way to give it deep feelings and lure the reader into the same emotions, of anger and frustration at the bigotry and corruption.
I was familiar with the Dreyfus affair and “J’accuse…!” the open letter published on 13 January 1898 in the newspaper L’Aurore by the influential writer Émile Zola. I lived in France two years and by all accounts the French see it as a shameful part of their history.
I never doubted that the historical data was right, but curiosity got the better of me, I researched a little hereand there and everything I looked up was spot on.
Whether readers are interested in the historical period or not, the book is farmore than historical. Today as we witness prejudices of our modern era,this book is a good place to start, pause and THINK.
I have always enjoyed Paulette’s writing, To Live Out Loud may well be my very favorite. A five star BRAVO!
on August 18, 2015

This is the second work by Paulette Mahurin, having previously read The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap. I was really caught up in her first novel and this piece grabbed me the same way.

Standing up for the unfairly judged is a strong theme and Paulette paints an intense tale of Zola’s powerful struggle. I doubt I would choose to come to Dreyfus’ aid were I in Zola’s shows. It further illustrates how far off course our culture may be with regard to this sort of heroic self-sacrifice.
From a historical perspective the work is dead on and well researched. She creates with words, Paris in a grand visual read.
Congrats to Paulette on another 5 star winner.

I would recommend this book to anyone. It doesn’t have to be your normal choice of read for you to be swept away.

on August 23, 2015
Just finished reading To Live Out Loud and felt moved to write this review. Ms. Mahurin writes about Emile Zola and his role in the infamous Dreyfus Affair. It divided the masses but ultimately resulted in massive changes in the criminal justice system. The author tells the story from the perspective of Zola’s good friend, Charles. The book chronicles Zola’s fight to free an innocent soldier, Alfred Dreyfus, from a treason charge. His ordeal was orchestrated by two military officers to protect another by the name of Esterhazy. Zola wrote about the case in a piece entitled. J’accuse. He found support among the leftist politicians but quickly developed political, religious opponents who subsequently charged Emile with a crime. Zola eventually escape to England in order to avoid imprisonment.
The story of this crucial case in French history is well written and told from a sympathetic point of view. Her style of writing seems forthright and clear. The author conveys the spirit of justice that fueld Zola’s work and the times he lived in (at the turn of the last century). It’s clear that Mahurin’s relied on careful research and in-depth biographical material. This sort of historical novel can be used in a number of scholarly settings (history classes, legal studies, courses on social and political change). At the start of each chapter, the author includes telling quotes from Zola’s writing. This technique brings to life his vision and character in a toucing manner. Aside from the value of understanding the historical context, the social and political influence of journalists of his stature, and the legal system of that time, it’s a fascinating story of courage and hope. I strongly recommend To Live Out Loud.
on August 21, 2015
To Live Out Loud has a wealth of historical research without ever losing the warmth and interest of a novel. The story of Emile Zola’s role in the Dreyfus Affair is indeed a “…moment in the history of human conscience”. Highly recommended.
on August 19, 2015

The Dreyfus affair and Emile Zola’s “J’Accuse!” provide the theme for this short book. I was roughly aware of the facts and seized the chance to better my understanding of the matter. As I read, it seemed to me that at any point since, we could point to this tale and say that it is particularly relevant now, because our society is currently…

The story starts in 1895 as an artillery officer is court martialled and hastily found guilty of passing France’s secrets to Germany. The man came from Alsace-Lorraine and Germany has recently annexed Alsace. Thus relations between the two nations are fraught. France has a constitution, since the overthrow of the monarchy, which states that all citizens are to be treated equally. However, a Jewish officer, Dreyfus, is not treated with respect and fairness but is picked on as a likely culpable person and swiftly consigned to jail.

The narrator is an engineer and friend of the family of Emile Zola, a man of letters who has gained work as a journalist. While Zola is not wealthy he in true French fashion supports a wife and mistress with their children. A key phrase which struck me is that these were “educated men, critical thinkers.” They choose not to believe the convenient court martial finding and look for evidence. A man comes forward with opposing evidence to the army, but he is swiftly transferred overseas and the officer he had accused is as swiftly exonerated. The army does not want to admit that it got things wrong.

Deciding that the hidebound Catholic influence, and intervention by the Papal Nuncio, inflame the time of hatred and need to be countered, Zola spends much effort to write a letter to the President and people, accusing France of having betrayed its own ideals. This is published in a prominent Parisian newspaper and a writ for libel ensues. Much of the rest of the story is concerned with the prejudiced court cases which follow, verdicts and appeals.

Largely this book is based upon conversations, with a few spare words for scene setting and personal description. I’m more comfortable with a little more movement and living in the moment, but our narrator is in his seventies by the time the affair is trundling between courts so this was never going to be an action adventure. Guns, swords, stone-throwing mobs and a possible case of murder do however appear, leaving us in no doubt of the anger and peril upon the Paris streets.

What I thought might be helpful to include, would be an explanation of the fact that France and most of the European continent uses Napoleonic code of law. This means that a person accused of a crime is considered guilty until proven innocent. In Ireland, Britain and elsewhere, the reverse is the case.
Also under Napoleonic code, the presiding judge is the one who controls all aspects of the case from investigation to the decision to take the matter to a courtroom to what may be shown to a jury – in some cases there is no jury. In a British or Irish case the judge’s influence does not begin until the investigation is ready to be prosecuted, though evidence and procedures must adhere to standards to be admissible.
An example can be found in the factual ‘Fatal Journey: The Murder of Trevor O’Keefe’ by Eroline O’Keeffe.

Zola’s words are quoted to us above each chapter, with great variety from humour to philosophy.
“One forges one’s style upon the terrible anvil of daily deadlines.”
“The truth is on the march and nothing will stop it.”

We need more of such heroes and I thank author Paulette Mahurin for once more bringing Emile Zola and the nation-changing Dreyfus affair to our generation.

on August 22, 2015
Paulette Mahurin has shown herself remarkably diverse in her choices of subjects, which once again demonstrated in her third novel by her selection of the Dreyfuss Affair that rocked France at the turn of the twentieth century, or rather the critical role played by the writer Emile Zola in bringing about eventual reversal of Dreyfuss’ wrongful conviction for spying. Paulette chronicles the extraordinary courage shown by Zola in publishing “J’Accuse” that led to his prosecution for (criminal) libel and his flight to England. Though both he and Dreyfuss were exonerated, sadly Zola did not live to enjoy old age, dying a couple of years later in a carbon monoxide poisoning event (either an accident or….). This turbulent life and time are beautifully chronicled by Paulette in this concise novel.
on August 21, 2015

The theme of an Intellectual viewed by an oppressing hegemony as a danger to be eliminated and a persona non grata is a universal one. It could happen -fortunately- at any era. In our society Amnesty International has accumulated several cases of inprisoned or ‘disappeared’ Intellectuals who dared to antagonise tyrants using their voice or reason and social justice.

So by default I am only too respectful to Ms Mahurin’s decision to deal with exactly this huge theme. In this occasion it is the infamous Dreyfus Affair which rocked France, from Zola’s perspective and narrated by his close, lifelong friend Charles. It is the journey of Emil Zola’s fight to defend Alfred Dreyfus from the unfair treason accusation that was orchestrated against him by Colonel Henry and Colonel Du Paty de Clam among else and to expose the real guilty part Esterhazy. Zola’s passionate J’accuse was supported by leftist politicians and George Clemenceau but found plenty of formidable enemies among the state, anti-Semites and the Catholic Church. Then as Zola was trialed and pronounced guilty he had to escape to England in order to escape imprisonment. He came back to France but he didn’t live enough to see justice being given and Dreyfus exonerated.

This fictionalised biopic/ political thriller is masterfully written. The tone is eloquent but formal, at times strict, matter-of-factish with short staccato sentences. It doesn’t indulge into floral descriptions of Parisien apartments, and leafy avenues and streetcars but I think this is only a wise decision of the author whose writing reflects the naturalist spirit of Zola. The author is given passionately into examining the fiery spirit and compassion of Zola and obviously the seriousness of the Affair and does not deviate but for releasing some necessary biographical notes.
Admirable wisdom is also shown by selecting Zola’s appropriate citations in the beginning of each chapter. The real Zola’s voice add to the character Zola flesh and blood which is made out of the most honest, fiery and humane material.
Concluding I consider this book a very successful writing venture, highly intelligent and I highly recommend it.

AMAZON U.K.

on 19 August 2015
A book which deals with injustice and discrimination….but not only in the abstract. You meet the people involved, feel their pain and see what it cost them to persist against the odds to see right done.

“To Live Out Loud” is a story about Emile’ Zola who is a novelist and writer living in the 1800’s. The back story of this book is a tale of Alfred Dreyfus, a Jewish man and an officer in the French Military. Through an elaborate dog-and-pony-show ignited and propagated by the French public and military, Dreyfus is court marshaled and sent to prison for being a traitor. The military court has found him guilty of providing secret military intelligence to Germany. Some in the public have their doubts about Dreyfus’s guilt, including Zola who believes that Dreyfus has been wrongly convicted and is actually an innocent man. In my mind, the main story of this novel is how Zola and his lifelong friend Charles Mandonette weigh out the dangers of writing a newspaper article that says Dreyfus is innocent and what will happen after it is published. Zola wants to tell the people of France that Dreyfus is indeed innocent and another officer is the actual traitor. Zola and Mandonette meet many times to discuss the implications of writing such an article while anti-Semitism runs rampant in France and determine being imprisoned for liable will likely be the outcome. Even with the threat of imprisonment, Zola publishes the article which infuriates the French public and military who label him a “Jew-Lover”. Soon after, Zola is arrested and tried in a kangaroo court for liable and sent to prison for a stint. While in prison, the leaders of France change and Alfred Dreyfus is given a retrial. I can’t tell you anymore about the story because it might ruin the ending for you.

“To Live Out Loud” is very well written. The sentence structure is very elaborate and very interesting to read. It draws you in and won’t allow you to skip a word and miss any of the story. There are quite a few characters in the novel that intertwine throughout the story so you have to follow closely and remember who is who. But the variety of characters brings fullness to the storyline and provides a closer look at the French people and their beliefs as well as the world at that period of time. My emotions ran from full-on-anger in some chapters to heart breaking sadness in others. The author has written some power stuff in “To Live Out Loud”. Stuff that pulls your thoughts away from going to the grocery store or that you still need to clean the bathroom. A good book should do that. It should pull you away from your normal, everyday life and that’s exactly what this novel does.

I liked this book. It was well worth my time to read it.

on 26 August 2015
Paulette is a master at writing books and she did not disappoint me in any way. I have read two other books by her and I do not normally read historical type books but this one actually got my interest and kept it. I think because it is something that is close to my heart, Standing up for someone or something that you believe in and fighting for it. I sat and read this book and completely could put myself in Emile Zola’s place and his friends place as well. Knowing that you are innocent as well as your friends and trying to prove it by standing up for what is right only to be knocked back down multiple times is so heart breaking. I was angry at some points and in tears at other points and completely enjoyed this book. Thank You Paulette for another wonderful story. “If people can just love each other a little bit, they can be so happy.” Emile Zola
Posted in AMAZON, ANIMAL RESCUE, Canine Adoption Rescue League, EMILE ZOLA, REVIEW: TO LIVE OUT LOUD, REVIEWS, Reviews: To Love Out Loud, Santa Paula Animal Rescue Center | 11 Comments

Need a Reason to Celebrate? I’ve Got You Covered!

The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap:

My very sweet friend, the ever talented Dr. Lorna Lee, has given me honor of posting her review of my book.

Originally posted on Lorna's Voice:

It's not what you got, Baby; it's how you use it! It’s not just what you got, Baby; it’s how you use it! And I know someone who’s got it and knows how to use it. Read on!

Be happy!

Today is a great day to smile, sing, dance, do what gets your endorphins swimming.

I said endorphins, not dolphins. But this looks fun... I said endorphins, not dolphins. But this looks fun, too…

Why?

I’ll tell you!

August 22 is Be An Angel Day. Oh the is too perfect.

Ta da! Coming outta of Cloud Nine just fur you! What can I do fur ya? Tell me, tell me! Oops! lost my halo. Oh well,  I'm sure someone'll fetch it fur me! Was that a squirrel! Ta da! Coming outta of Cloud Nine just fur you! What can I do fur ya? Tell me, tell me! Oops! Lost my halo. Oh well, I’m sure someone’ll fetch it fur me! Was that a squirrel!

But the real reason to be extra special, super-duper happy is that one of your favorite Indie authors (and definitely one of mine), Paulette Mahurin, has just released her new book in paperback!

Yes, yup, and uh huh!

It’s called To Live…

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THANK YOU FOR SAVING OUR LIVES

 

To everyone who has bought my book here is what your money is going toward. These are dogs rescued this year alone. This is in addition to funds going to SPARC from The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap (http://sparcsaveslives.org/) and CARL from His Name Was Ben (http://www.carldogs.org/)

 

14 y:o Terrance saved

14 year old Terrance going home

ARTIE: Bline senior

Artie, the blind senior, safe at home

ARTIE DOESN'T CARE THAT HE'S BLIND HE'S FREE AND HAPPY

Artie doesn’t care that he’s blind. He’s free. And happy.

Ballard went to the Bishon rescue group

Ballard went to the Bishon rescue group

Bonnie from the Downey shelter

Bonnie happy at home

choo choo going home

Choo Choo going home

DOLLY GOING HOME

Dolly tugging on that leash to get home and she’s on her way there.

FERNIE'S FREEDOM RIDE

Fernie’s freedom ride

FOXY'S FREEDOM RIDE

Foxy’s freedom ride

GERALDINE'S freedom ride. Looking a little scared.

Geraldine’s freedom ride, looking a little scared.

A HAPPIER GERALDINE AFTER RESCUE

A happier Geraldine with daddy.

Going home

Going home

home sweet home

Home sweet home and that grass feels so good.

Jessica's freedom ride

Jessica’s freedom ride.

JULES FREEDOME RIDE

Jules’ freedom ride

Lobo with dad

Lobo with new dad who’s wearing a shit that says “love.” Things are looking up.

Lolita and daddy.

Lolita with new daddy.

macdonald's freedom ride

MacDonald’s freedom ride

MANCHAS' FREEDOM RIDE day out of kill shelter

Mancha’s freedom ride

Mathis: saved from Wishes for pets from kill shelter

Mathis’ freedom ride.

nobel's freedom ride

Novel’s Freedom ride

Nobel happy at last living the good life

Novel happy at last living the good life.

Norton's freedom ride

Senior Norton’s freedom ride

Oreo with dad

Oreo with new dad

Senior Paco

Senior Paco in new home

TED AT HOME

Ted at home

Terrified Boxer family rescued by Karma rescue

Terrified boxer family rescued by Karma rescue

Tessa safe

Tessa safe at home

 

Where to purchase my books:

To Live Out Loud

http://www.amazon.com/Live-Out-Loud-Novel-ebook/dp/B012XXTRS2/ref=la_B008MMDUGO_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1438210990&sr=1-3

The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap

http://www.amazon.com/Persecution-Mildred-Dunlap-Paulette-Mahurin-ebook/dp/B008K9DV4U/ref=cm_cr_pr_pb_i

His Name Was Ben

http://www.amazon.com/His-Name-was-Paulette-Mahurin/dp/0692264698/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1411266674&sr=8-1&keywords=His+name+was+ben+by+paulette+mahurin

Posted in ACTS OF KINDNESS, ANIMAL RESCUE, ANIMALS, Canine Adoption Rescue League, DOGS & CATS, DOGS & CATS GOING HOME, DOGS RESCUED, HIS NAME WAS BEN, PERSONAL POSTS, PHOTOS, REVIEW: TO LIVE OUT LOUD, REVIEWS FOR HIS NAME WAS BEN, REVIEWS: HIS NAME WAS BEN, REVIEWS: THE PERSECUTION OF MILDRED DUNLAP, Reviews: To Love Out Loud, Santa Paula Animal Rescue Center, TO LIVE OUT LOUD, Volunteer Work, WHERE TO BUY | 17 Comments

Why do I promote my books?

I hope I can keep this short.

Many years ago, I was bitten by a tick. Two days later a huge bull’s eye rash appeared on my waist. Antibiotic treatment went well but six months later I had crippling mono-articular arthritis, cardiac arrhythmia, and meningitis. Month after month, heading into years, treatments failed, alternative medicine failed, meditation, imagery, you name it didn’t change the “Lyme Symptoms.” I fell into a depression and there by my side in bed with me was my rottie Tazzie. What changed was I became aware that her existence revolved around me. She didn’t want to walk, play, do much other than stay by my side. Because of that, something changed in me. I like to think that my heart opened to gratitude, for the simplest of acts done by my dog, my best friend. My husband had been wonderful but there was something about Tazzie that got through to me, to my heart, and made me aware, that as long as I can accept the hand I’ve been dealt I can be okay with what is. Whatever that is. My depression lifted. That was many years ago. That dog, that beautiful friend and family member, gave me something no one has ever done, a deep sense of gratitude for what I have that is good, that I don’t resist. That helped lessen resistance for the things I’d rather not experience. That’s a biggie for me, to just be okay with whatever. I owe it to my girl Tazzie. Because of this and my passion for dogs I write and give all my profits to help rescue dogs from kill shelters. Because of this I promote my books and ask for reviews. I don’t like to do it. It makes me feel like a pushy sales person. I brave through that aspect and shamelessly put up my reviews as a thank you and try to express as best I can my gratitude for all of you out there helping to spread the energy that will help a dog. There are a lot of Tazzie’s out there waiting to be free. Free to love and give back. RIP my sweet Tazzie girl.

Interview @ Tela's Notes Ends With Talk About Dogs

A painting I did of Tazzie

Press article on my profits to dogs:

http://www.vcstar.com/news/2012/sep/08/ojai-authors-historical-novel-teaches-tolerance/

Posted in ACTS OF KINDNESS, ANIMAL RESCUE, Canine Adoption Rescue League, DOGS & CATS GOING HOME, DOGS NEED HOME, DOGS RESCUED, PERSONAL POSTS | 34 Comments

Author Feature. Paulette Mahurin’s New Release: To Live Out Loud

The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap:

I’m honored by the support for my book.

Originally posted on Lada Ray Blog:

My dear friend Paulette Mahurin from California has just published her new book To Live Out Loud. She is one of the sweetwest and kindest people you will meet. Her books are about justice, compassion and about those who fight for the truth and against injustices of this world. Paulette is also a huge animal advocate; profits from her book sales help in dog rescue.

A couple of years ago I did a review (5 stars) of Paulette’s first book:

Book Review: The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap by Paulette Mahurin

The new book continues the historic and justice themes. It is a relatively short read – the paperback is 172 pages long.

Paulette Mahurin bookSYNOPSIS

In 1895, France was torn asunder by a scandal that rocked the nation and divided the country. An innocent Jewish military officer, Alfred Dreyfus, was unjustly sentenced to life imprisonment on a desolate island. The news that…

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To Live Out Loud Paperback is out

The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap:

The paperback of To Live Out Loud is out.

Originally posted on The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap:

 Thank you to everyone who has purchased my book and taken the time to write a review. All profits are going to help get dogs out of kill shelters.
To Live Out Loud FRONT PROMO copy

SOME RECENT REVIEWS FROM AMAZON US
To Live Out Loud By Paulette Mahurin 6 August 2015 As I began to read this book I was drawn in to a world captured in history, sprinkled with fiction and together makes a story that captures your attention while rupturing your very soul. To read the struggle of the main characters told through the eyes of their friend was not only telling, but truly moving. To be so utterly betrayed is overwhelming just to read about it…

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Book Review: To live out loud

The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap:

Thank you Mary Blowers, Author, for the lovely surprise of reading my book and posting a review to your blogsite. I’m grateful for this. Paulette

Originally posted on Mary Blowers, Author:

liveoutloud

Buy “To Live Out Loud: A Novel”

This historical novel is a vignette of Emile Zola’s life and intervention into the fate of Alfred Dreyfus. Dreyfus was a Jewish artillery officer and had been convicted of treason in a court-marshall in 1895. Many felt he was wrongly charged, including Emile Zola, who wrote an article about the unfair treatment and tried to defend him. This got Zola charged with criminal action on Dreyfus’ behalf, whereupon he fled France hoping to escape imprisonment.

The meat of the story is the belief that one must speak up for others being mistreated, even at personal cost. Zola was warned and yet did not hesitate to come to Dreyfus’ aid as best he could. This is a story of people helping the less fortunate and standing up for what is right. I hope this quality never disappears from our culture. Dreyfus’ wife and children…

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I was reminded of To Kill A Mockingbird

 A few of the more recent reviews. And a heartfelt thank you to everyone who bought the book and took the time to write a review. I’m very grateful. The paperback is coming soon.To Live Out Loud FRONT PROMO copy
From Amazon.com (U.S.)
on August 13, 2015
This is a well written and researched dramatisation of factual events. I was reminded of To Kill a Mocking Bird. The court case in this instance, revolves around prejudice;both racial and religious. Emile Zola wanted to hi-light the case of Alfred Dreyfus, a French artillery officer unjustly accused and convicted of treason.However, the man in question is not on trial but Emile, his supporter as he fights the French government, the military, and the Catholic Church.
Paulette Mahurin skilfully builds up the tension as the story unfolds. To Live Out Loud is a book that will enrich your life and leave you concious of not only the world’s past prejudices, but also of its present ones.
on August 17, 2015

To Live Out Loud is a fascinating and thought-provoking account of the French journalist Emile Zola and his involvement with the Alfred Dreyfus affair. Dreyfus was a Jewish French army officer falsely convicted of treason in the late 19th century. In 1898, Zola put himself and his family in grave danger by accusing the French army of anti-Semitism and the obstruction of justice. I knew very little about Zola before I began this book, but found myself very quickly drawn into the story through Mahurin’s vivid recreation of 19th century Paris.

Paulette Mahurin tells Zola’s story through the eyes of his fictitious friend Charles Mandonette. Mandonette cleverly functions as a kind of voice of the common person; asking himself that which many of us would wonder about ourselves: would we be brave enough to risk our safety in the pursuit of what is right?

Mahurin effortlessly weaves together fact and fiction, using real court transcripts from Zola’s trials. The book is meticulously researched and detailed; Mahurin proving herself a great historian as well as writer. Tension builds steadily throughout and I was left angry and frustrated at the incredible perversion of justice by the French army and the Catholic Church. I highly recommend this book as I believe Zola and Dreyfus’s story is one we all need to hear.

(All proceeds from the sale of this book also go help rescue dogs, so just another great reason to read it!)

on August 17, 2015
Historical novels are a delicacy of mine and this one is no exception. Paulette Mahurin has taken on a gross injustice in French history and has done an excellent job in writing about Emile Zola’s courage and persistence in pursuing justice. The detailed historical references are done with such precision–the reader feels as if he or she is sitting at the next table in a French cafe overhearing Emile and Charles (a fictional character) talking about the injustice that put Dreyfus, a Jewish French military officer, in a prison on false pretenses. The reader can feel the passion in Zola’s words and his intense desire to seek justice in a swirl of military and political corruption. An absorbing novel–one that any lover of historical novels, especially one based on injustice, should not miss!
on August 16, 2015
To live out loud is a a detailed chronicle about Alfred Dreyfus a jewish officer of French artillery that had been unjustly convicted of treason in a hasty court-martial and Emile Zola a journalist that choose to help Dreyfus and undertook the challenge to reclaim his freedom and clear his name. I’m not a fan of this genre but i have to say the author have done a great work, reading it i seem i was breathing the atmosphere of both 19th and start of 20th century and it is very well written, i really suggest everyone to read it.
on August 16, 2015

I have read most of Ms Mahurin’s works and will be a fan forever. This work caught me by surprise. I don’t know many versatile authors that can go from genre to genre SUCCESSFULLY like Ms Mahurin has. Even though this is a short work, I honesty think it may be her best. She writes with mature confidence and is in total control of the story and her skills. When writing historical “fiction,” (even worse, it is hardly fiction at all.) one runs the risk of stepping on the actual accounts of events. I wonder at Ms Mahurin’s own passion for injustice. It is a quality one rarely sees in this century of routine social media distortions and short attention spans.

Regarding the subject matter itself, I found the recounting to be shockingly timely. Will antisemitism ever stop? Our current middle East is seeped in it as our own POTUS is accused of it daily. And the parallel uncovering of governmental malfeasance is nothing new as our own and governments the world over lie to deflect from their own poor judgement and corruption.

A final comment. I loved the character of Charles. I wish I had seen more of the devils that I suspect tormented him. I was reminded (in style) of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s narrator in the Great Gatsby. Well done.

From Amazon.Canada:
 
5.0 out of 5 starsAmazing Courage Flying in the Face of the Establishment, Aug. 14 2015
By
Mys MSee all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)
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This review is from: To Live Out Loud: A Novel (Kindle Edition)

To Live Out Loud is an extremely compelling fictionalization of the story of convicted French spy/traitor, Alfred Dreyfus (Jan. 1895), and the part in his exoneration played by French author/journalist, Émile Zola. Dreyfus, a French Jew, had climbed up in the military at a time when anti-semitic feelings were running high. Despite the fact that France had passed a Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen in 1789 which guaranteed freedom of religion, the Catholic church, some newspapers, and definitely, the military establishment, saw the Jews as a threat to French security and the Catholic religion. When a document was uncovered revealing that someone highly placed was passing information to the German embassy, army intelligence leaped to the assumption that Dreyfus was guilty because he was a Jew. Émile Zola was present when

“Dreyfus was paraded out into the courtyard of the École Militaire on the Champ de Mars . . . ceremoniously degraded in public by having rank insignia, buttons, and braid cut from his uniform, and his dress sword broken. The crowd cheered as he was made to march around the grounds in his tattered uniform with his head bowed.”

Zola questioned why someone who had risen so high in the army would risk it all by turning traitor. To find out the truth, Zola risks everything: his career, his livelihood, his reputation, and his freedom. While he followed leads, discovering that documents that could have cleared Dreyfus had been kept from his defence attorney, layer upon layer of cover-up injustices became heaped one on top of the other. It became a deep conspiracy, the revealing of which shook the French justice system to its core.

Told through the eyes of a fictional friend of Zola’s, Charles Mandonette, an engineer who had worked with Zola Sr., and had known Émile since he was a child, the facts of the case are woven together in a riveting fashion. This story is extremely well-researched and many of the statements and documents are quoted verbatim from historical accounts: the tender line from a letter written from Dreyfus from his prison on Devil’s Island in French Guiana to his wife, Lucie, her letter to the court during Émile’s libel trial, letters and articles written by Zola in the Paris newspaper. Transcripts from the libel trials are included in excerpt to convey the court’s total disregard for uncovering the truth of the matter, and the vicious anti-semitic behaviours typical of the time.

Paulette would ask you to purchase this book because all the proceeds go to rescuing dogs from kill-shelters, which is a great cause, but you should buy this novel because it is an amazing story, well-told, which will keep you reading to the end in one sitting. It is that moving. The characters come to life. Each chapter begins with an appropriate quote from Zola. You could search online and find out how the story ends but you would miss out on what made Zola a great writer and humanitarian. If this book doesn’t make you want to read more about and by him, nothing will. Great historical fiction.

From Amazon U.K.

on 17 August 2015

This historical novel is a vignette of Emile Zola’s life and intervention into the fate of Alfred Dreyfus. Dreyfus was a Jewish artillery officer and had been convicted of treason in a court-marshall in 1895. Many felt he was wrongly charged, including Emile Zola, who wrote an article about the unfair treatment and tried to defend him. This got Zola charged with criminal action on Dreyfus’ behalf, whereupon he fled France hoping to escape imprisonment.

The meat of the story is the belief that one must speak up for others being mistreated, even at personal cost. Zola was warned and yet did not hesitate to come to Dreyfus’ aid as best he could. This is a story of people helping the less fortunate and standing up for what is right. I hope this quality never disappears from our culture. Dreyfus’ wife and children suffered for society’s ill treatment of Jews in general and Dreyfus in particular. Jews were severely discriminated against in France and many other places in the late 1800s and for many years, and like many other cultural groups it is through no fault of their own.

Kudos to Mahurin for bringing this story to light.

The book, taking place from 1895-1908 in France, is historical fiction based on historical facts involving the life of author Emile Zola dealing with his trial for libel. After Alfred Dreyfus, an innocent man, is unfairly convicted for the crime of treason in a hasty court-martial, Emile Zola, angry for the injustice of the conviction and the true committer of the crime found not guilty, writes an article accusing the military, courts and the French government of convicting Alfred in a cover-up. In response, from the backlash from the article, Emile finds himself in court defending himself in an unfair trial. The story follows all the trials and the appeals of Dreyfus and Zola leading to the untimely and suspicious circumstance surrounding Zola’s death. The story is a celebration of Zola’s life, writing career and his dedication to standing up for what is right.
To Purchase:
Other books by Paulette Mahurin:
His Name Was Ben
The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap
Posted in ABOUT THE BOOK, AMAZON, ANIMAL RESCUE, ANIMALS, EMILE ZOLA, INTOLERANCE, REVIEW: TO LIVE OUT LOUD, REVIEWS, THE DREYFUS AFFAIR, TO LIVE OUT LOUD, TOLERANCE | 14 Comments

To Live Out Loud by Paulette Mahurin

The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap:

Thank you so much for this very thorough and thoughtful review of my book. I’m grateful for it.

Originally posted on Ms M's Bookshelf:

to-live-out-loud-front-promo-copyThis is an extremely compelling fictionalization of the story of convicted French spy/traitor, Alfred Dreyfus (Jan. 1895), and the part in his exoneration played by French author/journalist, Émile Zola.  Dreyfus, a French Jew, had climbed up in the military at a time when anti-semitic feelings were running high.  Despite the fact that France had passed a Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen in 1789 which guaranteed freedom of religion, the Catholic church, some newspapers, and definitely, the military establishment, saw the Jews as a threat to French security and the Catholic religion.  When a document was uncovered revealing that someone highly placed was passing information to the German embassy, army intelligence leaped to the assumption that Dreyfus was guilty because he was a Jew.  Émile Zola was present when

Dreyfus was paraded out into the courtyard of the École Militaire on the Champ de Mars…

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Getting dogs out of kill shelters

10012620_524687094350615_5812323603440213328_n copy

This was posted by my friend Michelle Gent in the U.K. It’s too precious not to share and poignant that they were separated. And who says dogs don’t have emotions?

“This brother and sister dual, Xena and Zach, were rescued from a kennel, but separately. One day the owners were walking the dogs, and they ran into each other … still wearing the hankies from the kennel around their necks. This is how they greeted each other.”

All profits from all my books are going to get dogs like this out of kill shelters. For everyone who has purchased one of my book and taken the time to write a review, thank you. To everyone who has blogged or reblogged about any of my books, thank you. To all of you who have supported this effort with comments or conversations, thank you. I’m truly grateful and with every act of kindess a tail wags.

The paperback of To Live Out Loud should be out in a week.

Links for purchase of my books:

 

The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap

http://www.amazon.com/Persecution-Mildred-Dunlap-Paulette-Mahurin-ebook/dp/B008K9DV4U/ref=cm_cr_pr_pb_i

His Name Was Ben

http://www.amazon.com/His-Name-was-Paulette-Mahurin/dp/0692264698/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1411266674&sr=8-1&keywords=His+name+was+ben+by+paulette+mahurin

 

To Live Out Loud

http://www.amazon.com/Live-Out-Loud-Novel-ebook/dp/B012XXTRS2/ref=la_B008MMDUGO_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1438210990&sr=1-3

Posted in ACTS OF KINDNESS, ANIMAL RESCUE, ANIMALS, Canine Adoption Rescue League, DOGS & CATS, DOGS & CATS GOING HOME, DOGS RESCUED, HIS NAME WAS BEN, REVIEWS: HIS NAME WAS BEN, REVIEWS: THE PERSECUTION OF MILDRED DUNLAP, Reviews: To Love Out Loud, Santa Paula Animal Rescue Center, THE DREYFUS AFFAIR, TO LIVE OUT LOUD, TOLERANCE | 42 Comments

To Live Out Loud Paperback is out

 Thank you to everyone who has purchased my book and taken the time to write a review. All profits are going to help get dogs out of kill shelters.
To Live Out Loud FRONT PROMO copy

 

SOME RECENT REVIEWS FROM AMAZON US
To Live Out Loud By Paulette Mahurin 6 August 2015 As I began to read this book I was drawn in to a world captured in history, sprinkled with fiction and together makes a story that captures your attention while rupturing your very soul. To read the struggle of the main characters told through the eyes of their friend was not only telling, but truly moving. To be so utterly betrayed is overwhelming just to read about it much less be the one to experience it. But to have someone one in your corner to care so much that even at the cost of their own comfort, stability and possibly their life is truly incredibly selfless. Author Paulette Mahurin brilliantly weaves her story with such eloquence and talent that you find yourself emotionally drained by the time you’ve gotten through most of it. You can almost feel it physically, the prejudice, injustice and blatant disregard for the human depicted not only in the book but in history. “To Live Out Loud” will steel your soul and touch you in a way that will leave you forever changed, but fully integrated with the knowledge of humanities failures and what the love and friendship of someone can bring to the forefront the failures of humanity with an outcome of purpose. A truly special and well written read!!! An Absolute 5 Star Read!!!
on August 6, 2015
A fascinating historical fiction read about a scandal in 1895 France: The Dreyfus Affair; and how Emile Zola risked life and limb to exonerate this innocent man. Told through a fictitious protagonist, Charles Mandonette, a confidant of Zola. It is through this character we get to know Zola’s passion and drive and torment. Well told, well written, it draws on historical documentation and facts, interspersed with fictionalized scenes and dialogue that bring that time alive. Zola’s purpose was to live out loud, and therefore the title of the book, and in his purpose we learn about heroism and courage that few would dare to venture. That this is based on a true story makes it all the more compelling a read. My hats off to the author for doing justice to Zola and to The Dreyfus Affair.
on August 6, 2015
A fascinating read with universal appeal perfectly executed. The subject of the book is Emile Zola’s involvement in the appalling example of a miscarriage of justice when Alfred Dreyfus was wrongly imprisoned for life for a crime he didn’t commit. The book brings to life the political and judicial scandal and how it divided French society. As events unfold we see the racism of the time, the determination of the church and the military forces to protect their position and the manipulation of both the courts and the people. The result is not only an exemplary piece of historical fiction but also a consideration of how the powerful protect their interests even today. The subject is well-researched and accurate but Mahurin’s gift is her ability to capture the essence of her subject matter within her stories, always drawing on the human element and weave the facts into a compelling read that is both informative and relevant to today. Highly recommend.
5.0 out of 5 starsPaulette Mahurin continues to amaze! She illuminates history as well as she reveals her boundless compassion. Emile Zola came, August 8, 2015
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This review is from: To Live Out Loud: A Novel (Kindle Edition)
I liked the pacing and emotional engagement. I would have enjoyed more details about the lives and thoughts of his wife, mistress and children, but perhaps these details are also lost to history.
on August 10, 2015

When I began reading this book, I wasn’t exactly sure what to expect. It felt like historical fiction mixed with a little bit of Joseph Conrad and Dickens. As I fell deeper into the story, however, it became clear that this book was so much more.

Their isn’t a lot of action in this novel, but it doesn’t need any. It is brilliantly written with a lot of very precise dialogue and heartfelt storytelling. The tone is very morose and hopeful at the same time, letting us wish for a better world while showing us the true nature of reality.

I love the way the narration is first person, but withheld. It reminds me of Heart of Darkness where the story is about a different character than the one telling it to us. It gives the possibility for an unreliable narrator, but this style is more along the lines of a reliable narrator with an agenda. However, it isn’t an agenda many readers would disagree with because he is on the side of right and good.

The relationships are well developed and the characters intensely defined. This book is highly recommended and well worth a read!

Posted in ABOUT THE BOOK, AMAZON, ANIMAL RESCUE, Canine Adoption Rescue League, EMILE ZOLA, INTOLERANCE, PROMO, REVIEW: TO LIVE OUT LOUD, REVIEWS, Reviews: To Love Out Loud, Santa Paula Animal Rescue Center, THE DREYFUS AFFAIR, TO LIVE OUT LOUD, TOLERANCE, WHERE TO BUY | 7 Comments

Mankind has learned nothing from history

As all my profits are going to help get dogs out of kill shelters I want to thank all who have purchased my book and taken the time to write a review. I’m truly grateful for your support and feedback. Review from Romania:

5.0 out of 5 starsA story that will stay with me forever, August 2, 2015
This review is from: To Live Out Loud: A Novel (Kindle Edition)
A story that will stay with me forever, To Live Out Loud was a touching, terrifying book at times. So well written. Terrifying as it makes me realize, once again, that mankind has learned nothing from history and mistakes are repeated over and over again. I’m sad to see prejudice and narrow mindedness, the main themes of Mrs. Mahurin’s novel are so valid in our modern times, and so called ”democratic” countries. The principle of the freedom of the individual subordinated to that of national security is tackled in a masterful way in the story. Told in the first person by Charles Mandonette, lifelong friend of Emile Zola, the novel presents in a fictionalized form the great scandal that divided the French society during the Third Republic, because of the fixation in the minds of French nationalists that there was a conspiracy to destroy France’s Catholic identity. The most easily identifiable enemies were the Jews, because many were rich and their talents had led to a disproportionate presence in the judiciary, the civil service, the press and even the army. To Live Out Loud is a message novel, hatred or judgmental attitude highlighted in the smooth flowing story. Documents of that time are interspersed with fiction which makes the book a very special one. I read Zola’s books but I must confess my ignorance on this aspect of his great character – his courage and determination, his belief that truth must be defended no matter the consequences, and his dedication in fighting against injustice and prejudice. Even if defending the truth may jeopardize his own reputation and name. The pace and quality of the writing kept me anxiously flipping pages to see what would happen to Dreyfus and Zola. I wasn’t familiar with this critical event in the history of France so To Live Out Loud was a captivating view on the events. As I read all the other books written by this author, I can say that Mrs.Mahurin has an art in writing that just captivates you and you get sucked into the story.
Review from South Africa
5.0 out of 5 starsLoving this out loud., August 2, 2015
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This review is from: To Live Out Loud: A Novel (Kindle Edition)
So I finished reading this book yesterday. I am glad I could not write my review directly because yesterday I was still thinking that this book is a very strong 4* read.It is a novel yes but it is foremost a historical novel. Which is something I love. However it is a short read with the emphasis on the historical aspect leaving little in the way of character development. And for me, identifying with a character is extremely important. So more than 24 hours later I keep playing the story over and over in my mind. And I have changed my mind.I cant relate so well with any of these characters because; I am not this selfless. I have never been so effused by a cause that I literally put my life on hold for it. Offered my life for it. I have never met a person whom is so utterly human and at the same time such a true hero whom I could admire. My own fallacies is the reason I had difficulty relating. I have heard the term – The Dreyfus affair before but honestly I assumed it was simply another American scandal and I was too lazy to look into it or question it. I am not sure what the curriculum is in other countries but in South Africa we have only touched on the French Revolution and learned about France’s role in WWII as a side note. Loving history as much as I do I now realize that I have an entire country to study up on. I loved the French location etc giving the book some more depth and more to love. I can only hope to find a person I can admire this much. That in a very small way I can live my life out loud like this. Taking a stand. Making life better.
on August 2, 2015
Paulette Mahurin has brought to life the France of the late nineteenth century…a society turning on itself in the wake of the humiliation of its defeat by Prussia and the challenge to those responsible for the defeat by the Paris commune; a country where scapegoats were required. This is a superb, human picture of those involved in the Dreyfus affair – a great introduction, too, for those who have vaguely heard of it without appreciating its significance in the wider context of discrimination.
on August 2, 2015
Paulette Mahurin, a writer well known for taking on biases (see her first novel, The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap) makes self-examination happen again, this time with To Live Out Loud, the exquisitely rendered fictionalized portrait of the Dreyfus Affair, a true story of anti-semitism and the fallout from (extremely brave)writer Emile Zola’s public letter accusing the government of the unlawful conviction of Alfred Dreyfus, a French-Jewish Army General Staff officer sentenced to life on Devil’s Island, for espionage (but of course he didn’t do it). Mahurin has a firm grip on her material, and pacing and language are superlative, which means I’ll be giving To Live Out Loud to all my friends come the holidays. Highly recommend.
on August 4, 2015

I am so glad I read this book for so many reasons. Here is one or two

First of all, all proceeds goes to rescuing dogs. Now that is a cause I understand and hooray for the efforts of the author to do something so noble.
Secondly. I have a 10 year old daughter, and although this book might be a bit above her head at this stage I fully plan that she read it once she is ready. I believe all children should see a good example and the more the better.
What better example than one where a man gives his life to give back honour to another mans live.

I think my husband, a history buff may love this as well. So now I have an idea for a virtual Christmas stocking filler to boot.

MORE RECENT REVIEWS:
on August 4, 2015
I was given a copy of this book to do a read and honest review on. Based on the 1895 scandal that rocked a nation and divided France, a Jewish soldier was unjustly sentenced to a lifetime imprisonment to Devil’s Island. When the news broke that he was falsely accused, Emile Zola stepped up to the plate to expose the facts to exonerate Alfred Dreyfus. The riveting events that are portrayed, based on factual events, make for a compelling read in this fictionalized story based on the true unfolding of the Dreyfus Affair and Zola’s attempts to free Dreyfus. Taken from courtroom transcripts and documented historical references the author weaves a story with scenes and dialogue that read like a top rate thriller, right down to the last page. Highly recommend.
5.0 out of 5 starsZola and Dreyfus in Search of Justice, August 4, 2015
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This review is from: To Live Out Loud: A Novel (Kindle Edition)
Paulette Mahurin took her unusual title for this powerful little book from Emile Zola: “If you ask me what I came into this life to do, I will tell you: I came to live out loud.” In the aftermath of the travesty of Alfred Dreyfus’ 1895 trial and conviction for treason, Emile Zola is driven to use the power of his words, reputation, health and financial status to undo the injustice that tears at his soul. He is a devout Frenchman at heart and to see the anti-Semitism, lies, cover-ups and intrigue in the army, the judiciary and political camps is more than he can tolerate. He must find a way to redeem Dreyfus. The task he sets himself pulls on the strength of family and friends as assaults are made on his name, his allies, his home and his safety.
Mahurin uses the literary device of the fictional friend, Charles Mandonette, as narrator, interpreter and observer to follow Zola in his life and efforts. Charles, a father figure to Zola, guides, supports and agonizes over Zola as the writer digs into the matter of Dreyfus’ case. A noted novelist, playwright and liberal journalist, Zola hopes his article, J’Accuse , will result in a charge of libel against him, allowing Zola to introduce evidence on behalf of Dreyfus. He, sadly, underestimates the deep veins of corruption and power at work through the army, the government and the Catholic Church. Zola’s attorney is unable to secure their goal in the suit or in appeal and Zola ultimately flees to England for his safety as venom pours from the mouths and actions of Parisians. In 1899, the new government unseats the corrupt politicos, the power of the church and the army until Zola’s new trial gains the goal of freedom for Dreyfus by way of a presidential pardon.
In the generous use of Zola’s own words, a letter to the court by Lucie Dreyfus and other resources, Mahurin draws the reader into the intrigue and anguish of this historically true story. Her use of dialog and ruminations by both men are done in the spirit of the day, with speech patterns in a cadence reflective of the setting and era. The reader experiences the conflict, angst and courage of Zola as he paces, drinks his teas and wines, seeks fresh air. Seen through Charles’ eyes, Zola is drawn as a compassionate risk-taker who wants justice above all else. It will be more years before Dreyfus is exonerated and Zola does not live to see it.
Paulette Mahurin is a risk-taker in that she writes of challenging subjects: Lesbian relationships in The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap; the devastation that is cancer in His Name Was Ben; and, now, anti-Semitism and political corruption in To Live Out Loud. Mahurin’s two historical fiction books, set over 100 years ago, speak to the present. In a world increasingly marred by violence, pessimism easily takes root. Mahurin shows us that courage, hope and trust in humankind is not to be lost when such as Mildred, and Zola follow their hearts and beliefs. Each found support from others to champion their causes and prevail.
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To Live Out Loud by Paulette Mahurin

My latest novel is out and I’m thrilled to share it with all my family and friends. All profits are going to help rescue dogs from kill shelters. Below is a brief synopsis and some of the first reviews on Amazon.

To Live Out Loud FRONT PROMO copy

SYNOPSIS

In 1895, France was torn asunder by a scandal that rocked the nation and divided the country. An innocent Jewish military officer, Alfred Dreyfus, was unjustly sentenced to life imprisonment on a desolate island. The news that could exonerate him was leaked to the press, but was suppressed by the military. Anyone who sought to reopen the Dreyfus court-martial became victimized and persecuted and was considered an enemy of the state. Émile Zola, a popular journalist, determined to bring the truth to light, undertook the challenge to publicaly expose the facts surrounding the military cover-up. This is the story of Zola’s battle to help Alfred Dreyfus reclaim his freedom and clear his name. Up against anti-Semitism, military resistance, and opposition from the Church of France, Zola committed his life to fighting for justice. But was it worth all it cost him, to those around him, and to France? This is a narrative of friendship, courage, and love in the face of the adversity and hatred. It is a story of how one man’s courageous actions impacted a nation. From the award winning author of The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap comes a book that will leave you examining your notions about heroism, courage, and your role in social change long after you read the last sentence.

REVIEWS

AMAZON.COM

5.0 out of 5 stars French history brought to life, July 30, 2015
By
This review is from: To Live Out Loud: A Novel (Kindle Edition)
J’accuse. With that one word, Emile Zola took on the French government, the military, and the Catholic Church in defense of Alfred Dreyfus, a French artillery officer unjustly accused and convicted of treason. Told from the perspective of Zola’s fictional friend Charles, To Live Out Loud recounts the story of how Zola – who had no relationship with Dreyfus – became involved, bringing passion and commitment and risking his own life to fight not just for Dreyfus but also for truth and liberty in his beloved France. In this tightly written little novel, author Paulette Mahurin skillfully blends fact and fiction while conveying the tension, suspense, and anti-Semitic climate in France of the time. I was engaged from the first page.
5.0 out of 5 starsA Stunning Piece of Historical Fiction, August 1, 2015
By
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This review is from: To Live Out Loud: A Novel (Kindle Edition)
This historical fiction novel, To Live Out Loud, is the epitome of what this genre is all about. Paulette Mahurin takes us to France where we meet Alfred Dreyfus and Emile Zola, as well as a Jewish friend of Zola’s who relates this intriguing tale.

The entire purpose of the historical fiction genre is to allow the reader to be transported to a different time, a different place, and at the end of the read, hopefully learn something the reader did not know before. Mrs. Mahurin has done all of the above and she has done so magnificently. She places us is France, she places us at the Dreyfus trial, she places us in moments where Zola garners the courage to stand up against what he feels is injustice. I believe this is what makes this book so special. This is the learning moment from the novel. It can apply to our lives today. So many people are complacent with things that happen all around, which we know are wrong, but are afraid to confront. This novel shows that what is needed is that courage to stand for what you know is right. The story is told very well. The writing is descriptive and flows nicely. The chapters are short, which makes reading it so easy. This is truly a stunning piece of historical fiction. One that I highly recommend.

on August 1, 2015
I am a lover of history, and this historical fiction book fit the bill. I loved the plot and detail in the story. Of course, I loved the story itself as well. It is a story the deserves telling. Ms. Mahurin is one of my favorites for shining the light on injustices and the fight against them (see the Persecution of Mildred Dunlap). The dialogue was fantastic. I love the description of a character (whom I will not name for fear of a spoiler) as “a character of questionable repute”. The vivid descriptions served the story as well.What I liked best: I love the fight for justice. The strength necessary and tribulations endured by Emile Zola make me question how I would react if placed in a similar situation. I can hope that I would act the same, but I’m not certain that I would. In either case I loved reading this story, and turned page after page to find out the outcome. I would recommend this book to any and all readers. The fight against injustice and prejudice can be applied to any era and appreciated by all. It is a wonderful tale that will stir emotions inside you and provoke many internal debates. You will be happy you read it, I assure you.
5.0 out of 5 starsIntimate View of the Dreyfus Affair and Emile Zola’s involvement, July 31, 2015
This review is from: To Live Out Loud: A Novel (Kindle Edition)
“This cleverly woven historical novel details the background of the Dreyfus Affair in the late 19th century, and injects the passionate writings and actions of Emile Zola on behalf of justice. As told through a narrator friend of Zola’s, the reader will clearly understand the devious forces at work to falsely implicate a Jewish army captain in a political coverup. With the moral stature of France itself in jeopardy, the outcry caused by the elaborate deception eventually brings France back to stasis and a new way forward, her honor restored. The fluid writing draws the reader through this well-researched time period, with the emotions of the age exposed. I recommend this highly readable book.” Margaret Kay Dodd, publisher of The Green Stick: A Memoir by Reg van Cuylenburg
5.0 out of 5 starsA treat of a novel: convincing, important and moving, July 30, 2015
This review is from: To Live Out Loud: A Novel (Kindle Edition)
The author has chosen a memorable moment in history to illustrate the need for tolerance. The novel focusses on a world famous scandal and miscarriage of justice in France and the subsequent, long winded attempt to clear the name of a man falsely accused of treason. Told from the perspective of an outsider, a family friend, we see Dreyfus, his wife and the man who takes on their case with loving and caring eyes. This creates an intimacy for us reader that makes the politically motivated incident and the anti-Jewish sentiments of the time all the more tragic and despicable. Written with a smooth and continuous flow this story wastes no time and sticks to the relevant events. The quotes from Emile Zola that run through the chapter headings show what a man he was – as does Mahurin with her great characterisation with all the people in this precious novel. Few authors can say so much in so little words. Prepare to be moved by this wonderfully told piece if historic fiction and the sense of humanity that the author brings to the pages so vividly. The book is a testament to the strong ones who stand up for their beliefs and work hard to make the world a better place. We must never forget what the world would be like without those heroes who continue to force the world forward into a more human society. A real treat of a novel, convincing, important and utterly enjoyable.
5.0 out of 5 starsA MUST READ!, July 29, 2015
By
This review is from: To Live Out Loud: A Novel (Kindle Edition)
I think this is Paulette’s best yet. A fascinating part of history that is depicted in a well told manner. I was pulled in and actually became a part of the story fighting for justice. Highly recommended!!!
All Amazon.com reviews:
AMAZON U.K.
on 2 August 2015
This is a fabulous read! Combining real events that have been wonderfully researched with a fictional character to narrate the story, the author has brought to life the 1895 story of Dreyfus condemned to life imprison and branded a traitor for a crime he didn’t commit. This takes place in France and we follow the attempts of Emile Zola to prove his innocence. Zola writes a headline newspaper story revealing the truth but is then sued for libel and the authorities do everything possible to prevent the truth coming out. It is the story of how one man risked everything to help a fellow human being who had been unjustly accused and for no personal gain, simply having the courage to speak out against the army and government for the sake of his beliefs. Brilliantly written, as I have come to expect from this author, I read the book in one sitting and felt very uplifted at the end that there are people in the world who will risk all for what is right. As relevant today as in 1895 this is a great book and an easy 5*.
on 31 July 2015
What does it mean to have courage? Who are the heroes in any struggle? Are they only the ones in the public eye who take a stand and suffer the consequences of colliding with the status quo? Or could the heroes be those who work unfailingly behind the scenes, supporting, encouraging, and giving sustenance to those outspoken leaders of “the cause?”Beyond these compelling philosophical questions, Paulette Mahurin’s newest book tackles the unfortunately ageless human tragedy of prejudice and the concomitant social injustices that inevitably follow. She uses the infamous Dreyfus Affair, set in late 19th century France as her entre into exploring both the best and the worst in humankind. While Alfred Dreyfus (an officer in the French military who was also Jewish) was unjustly imprisoned for treason, he is not the central character of this novel. Emile Zola, a notable French writer and journalist who adamantly believes in justice takes up the cause of exposing the injustice that was done to Dreyfus. Mahurin deftly tells this historically accurate tale through the eyes of Zola’s lifelong friend, mentor, and father-figure—a man named Charles.Meticulously researched (with passages from actual court records), passionately written, and told in the fashion of other novels that make history read like fiction (Laura Hillenbrand’s “Seabiscuit” or “Unbroken”), Mahurin’s book is a must-read. I not only learned a great deal about this historical episode of government corruption and cover-up, but I gained an appreciation for the deep roots of global anti-Semitism. These problems are not only the stuff of current events. This book illustrates the disheartening reality of how the darkest elements of human society endure through the centuries.

Mahurin’s book also reminds the reader that countervailing forces to this bleak historical orbit of political corruption and hatred exist. There are heroes—both outspoken and quiet—among us. All are working in their own ways toward a just and better world. Mahurin is one of those heroes.


on 30 July 2015
I was given a copy of this book to do a read and honest review on. Based on the 1895 scandal that rocked a nation and divided France, a Jewish soldier was unjustly sentenced to a lifetime imprisonment to Devil’s Island. When the news broke that he was falsely accused, Emile Zola stepped up to the plate to expose the facts to exonerate Alfred Dreyfus. The riveting events that are portrayed, based on factual events, make for a compelling read in this fictionalized story based on the true unfolding of the Dreyfus Affair and Zola’s attempts to free Dreyfus. Taken from courtroom transcripts and documented historical references the author weaves a story with scenes and dialogue that read like a top rate thriller, right down to the last page. Highly recommend.
Where to purchase (Paperback is due out in a couple of weeks)
Or at any other Amazon site
Posted in AMAZON, ANIMAL RESCUE, Canine Adoption Rescue League, EMILE ZOLA, INTOLERANCE, PROMO, REVIEWS, Reviews: To Love Out Loud, THE DREYFUS AFFAIR, TO LIVE OUT LOUD, WHERE TO BUY | 60 Comments

The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap by Paulette Mahurin

The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap:

What a nice way to start the week with this surprising blog post. A review of The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap. Thank you so much for reading my book and taking the time to write this review. Paulette

Originally posted on Ms M's Bookshelf:

PersecutionOfMildredDunlapThe Persecution of Mildred Dunlap is set in a small town in Nevada called Red River Pass in the year 1895. The story begins the day a telegram arrives with the news that author Oscar Wilde has been sentenced to two years hard labour by a British court of law under the recently passed gross indecency law making it illegal for men to have sex with men. When the news arrives in Red River Pass, it sets into motion a series of events of racism, hatred, religious discrimination, vicious rumour, jealousy, and, finally, subtle, satisfying revenge.  It reminded me a bit of Little House on the Prairie where Nellie and her mother were always stirring things up and starting rumours, except that here it’s carried to extremes.  As in any community, there are people who bully others and indulge in malicious gossip and those who refuse to stand up to them…

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The reviews are in…but whose?

The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap:

Thank you Lorna for the great shout out. Very grateful.

Originally posted on Lorna's Voice:

Hey, I get the scoop any way I can. Don't judge me. Hey, I get the scoop any way I can. Don’t judge me.

I’ve been busy torturing interviewing some blogger-authors lately.

You may have noticed.

You may be wondering, “Did that cracker-jack blogger/author/interviewer (I’m talking about me, here, People) actually read the books she so generously promoted?”

Well, I’m here to tell you that wonders do cease.

Yes I did…read the books.

And here’s what I thought of them. NOTE: these are abbreviated reviews. For the full reviews click on the book links I provided on the titles.

Seeing_Eye_FRONT_FINAL_Kindle

I interviewed author/blogger, Liz Marshall, a while back. She wrote Seeing Eye: A day At the Fair. Here’s what I thought:

Liz Marshal is a gifted writer and Seeing Eye is the kind of murder mystery that I love.

The plot has enough twists and turns to keep you guessing to the very end and her characters are real–they have flaws, good…

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Lessons

The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap:

This is great. A very clever way to communicate important messages. Deserves sharing and the world sure needs it.

Originally posted on ladysighs:

He took a ride and ate a snack
And threw the wrapper out the back
Then did the same with his canned drink
Some folks just do not stop to think

car1

He raked some leaves and piled them high
Although they were a wee bit dry
He lit a match to let them burn
Some folks just never ever learn

fireHe took a drink got in his car
And said he wasn’t going far
Perhaps the wreck is just as well
He’ll learn his lessons now in jail

carwreck

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RIP LADY LUCK

Lady Luck joined our family on May 20, 2014 at the ripe age of what we were told was 15. She was emaciated, depressed, and disoriented, since it had only been three days since she was dumped at a kill shelter. The drive back to our place took 2 1/2 hours and in that time I hugged her until she decided she wanted to stand, stick her head out the window and catch every smell out there. When we got home we gave her a bath, to wash away what should have remained on a lawn somewhere. The first photo below is this beautiful girl after her bath, making herself right at home.  She fit right in with Max & Bella and has been a part of our family for the past nine and a half months. She died peacefully this morning of a stroke as we held her in our arms.

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After her first bath, she made herself right at home in our house and hearts.

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A beautiful and very sweet girl.

Posted in ACTS OF KINDNESS, ANIMAL RESCUE, ANIMALS, DOGS & CATS, DOGS & CATS GOING HOME, DOGS RESCUED | 166 Comments

What is important in life

Thank you to Carl Sundholm for this very thoughtful review of my book. I’m grateful for this feedback and all who have purchased my book and taken the time to write a review. All profits are going to help rescue dogs.

5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best books I have read – Great potential for a movie, if done with the right people!, March 1, 2015
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: His Name was Ben (Paperback)
Paulette Mahurin is an emerging award-winning author who should be on the “must read” list of those in-the-know. Her second book, “His Name Was Ben,” is a very rare, significant and insightful short story that uses a real life inspired story of facing immanent death from terminal cancer to teach what is important in life. This is an extraordinarily compelling short story, written in a way that quickly engrosses the reader in the characters’ experience of dealing with a terminal illness, which left me thinking about important questions about what death teaches about how life should be lived. Most people avoid thinking about death until someone near or dear to them dies, or when they are themselves face the prospect of their own death. The young rarely give much thought to the certainty of their eventual death, because their hopes and plans for the future loom on the horizon or because they are so engrossed in the present moment that thoughts do not turn to their future mortality. But as one lives life, and one’s contemporaries begin to pass away, the thoughts of many shift to the increasing proximity of their own eventual death, and coming to terms with it. This process of is accelerated with those who learn that they are living on “borrowed time” due to a terminal disease. And so this story of “His Name Was Ben” is told from the viewpoint of Sara, a thoughtful and insightful person who is facing the prospect of immanent death while being treated for terminal cancer. By chance, she meets she meets Ben, a fellow cancer patient who is traveling the same road and is facing similar issues. Together they work with one another in the attempt to gain the inner peace with which to face death by understanding and coming to terms with the issues, people, and insecurities that beset them during their lives. How they do this, the insights they gain, and the choices they make, are invaluable lessons for those whose consciousness has evolved to the point of realizing that such wisdom should be used to enrich our lives now, well before we face our eventual death.

All Amazon.com Reviews for His Name Was Ben: http://www.amazon.com/His-Name-was-Paulette-Mahurin/product-reviews/0692264698/ref=pr_all_summary_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1&sortBy=bySubmissionDateDescending Just received word that I was nominated by a group of over 5,000 members of Amazon Reviewers as their #1 Author. This is quite an honor: Wanda's Amazing Amazon ReviewersRECENT REVIEW FOR THE PERSECUTION OF MILDRED DUNLAP:

Format: Kindle Edition
What a marvelous riveting read! The story really grabs the reader. I found myself expecting the worst for Mildred and Edra and actually dreading the ending. I’ll say no more as I don’t want to spoil it for others like myself who have never been familiar with the history behind the story. It’s not the kind of thing I normally read and I absolutely loved it!
ALL AMAZON.COM REVIEWS FOR THE PERSECUTION OF MILDRED DUNLAP:
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Darmie Orem‘s review

Apr 16, 15
Read in April, 2015


His Name was Ben Author: Paulette Mahurin Rating: 5***** Summary:How many times do I have to relive this? Blinking away tears, she moved her hand under the sheet into her nightie, to rough wrinkles and edges of scar tissue that had failed to heal in normal time because of infection, delaying chemo and radiation treatment…. Scheduled on a journey of death and quietly praying for miracles that would expand her existence, life suddenly became significant. In her aspiration to escape mortality, she met the right man, another cancer patient, who brought her the contentment her life has never for once experienced. However, the story of true love soon ended. A twosome became single, but not without rebuilding the broken. The story His Name Was Ben, takes place in some areas in U.S, and Ojai California where beautiful Sara Philips, a nurse practitioner and a divorcee lives by herself in the same city with (a cold mother, a father with a heart problem and a schizophrenic brother. Sara lives a tough life, and experienced a number of problems: Henry who dumps her, three years into their marriage, for a metaphysical cult he is involved in and makes her she shied away from sentimental investments with men. A mother with sickening attitude that can’t offer her daughter sincere comfort when dilemmas hits hard, ridicule because of a schizophrenic brother, and an abuse from the same brother which snatched away memory of a sweet childhood and plague the future with nightmares. As Sara’s treatment continues at UCLA with Doctor Zimmerman, we soon see in the story that Sara meets Michael Gottilieban attorney who works at NASA, and a fellow cancer patient. Intrigued by Ben’s good looks and situation, what Sara has successfully kept blocked for so many years begins creeping back in, one dream, one image, and one memory at a time—the pieces of a puzzle that has not yet formed a whole picture. But, entertaining the idea of receiving affirmation from Ben that she is still attractive is a balm. And wanting to feel normal, she continues to obsess over Ben. When Sara is encouraged by her close friend Ellen to tell Ben of her feelings, she’s reluctant. But she soon gathers the confidence to tell him and he blocks her flirtation. Ben’s mind is set in a fixed direction, and that is to concentrate on his treatment and only that. After a little while, Ben swings from his determination to stay the course with his treatment and not get involved with any woman. He gradually takes to Sara. And the feelings the two of them couldn’t think is for real becomes the best thing that ever happens to the two of them. While Sara is experiencing encouraging changes from the ongoing approved cancer studies in UCLA, Ben’s health deteriorates. In spite the challenges, Ben and Sara gets married. And seven weeks after, Ben lost his life to the terminal illness. He dies, resolving the emotional trauma Sara has been hiding from her entire life. He dies leaving her a mended and fulfilled woman. Writing style: The writing style of the author is luxuriant. She used glowing descriptions and really paint clear picture of every event that went down in the novel in the most engrossing way. The novel flows like story told from the author to the readers without uncertainties. The parallel stories developed in the greatest fascinating forms. The author’s messages of life’s tests, liberation, love and fulfillment are clear and powerful in the middle of the story and at the end of it. She gave Sara a much fulfilled ending. She provides us with the value to be hopeful no matter what befalls us in life. My thoughts:His Name was Ben, is a sumptuous true story. Sometimes fate would try to discourage us from reaching fulfillment in life by deriding us with all sort of tests, but this story leads me to believe that a person would always find exciting ending no matter the situations which reduces his chance of a fulfilled life. The rest of us should encourage ourselves, repair our broken faith that we can never find extraordinary fulfillment because of the hindrances we have presently to the flow of exciting happenings in our lives.After tempestuous days, triumph stands by those that have faith in happy ending.
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Compassionate Giving

Bless all those who help others, especially at their own peril. Stay safe, my friend.

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Dr. Larry Stock, my friend from working in the Antelope Valley Emergency Room, is helping Ebola patient’s in Africa. See what he writes below the photo.

Donning the “suit” is an essential step before entering the “hot zone”. This is where we treat diagnosed Ebola patients. Entering this completely closed protection requires the help of a tender. Each component part of this uniform is essential and must be respected. Once inside, it is like a sauna, and feels claustrophobic. I am getting more comfortable and acclimated to working under these conditions. Each day is long, but I am meeting fascinating people every day, and continue to grow and learn.

https://www.facebook.com/larry.stock.9?fref=photo

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